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John Baker, Kathleen Lynch, and Judy Walsh

Introduction In October 2008, the Minister for Finance announced a 43 per cent reduction in the budget of the Equality Authority (hereafter EA). The cut was opposed by the Authority’s board and its CEO, Niall Crowley. A request to reduce it to 32 per cent, based on a revised work plan, was rejected. Crowley resigned, as did six board members, including the nominees of the Irish Congress of Trade Unions (ICTU) and the Irish Business and Employers Confederation (IBEC). Sharp exchanges took place on the Dáil floor and in the media, while civil society mobilised

in Defining events
Shayk Muhammad Afifi Al-Akiti

a misguided personal opinion in authority from fiqh and an effort to hijack our Law by invoking just one of the many qaḍāyā of this bāb while recklessly neglecting others). It should serve to remind the students of fiqh of the importance of legal analysis and awareness of the thawābit and the ḍawābiṭ when reading a furū‘ text, in order to ensure that the principal rules have not been breached in any given legal case. The above opinion is problematic in three legal particulars [ fuṣūl ]: the target [ maqtūl ]: without doubt, civilians

in ‘War on terror’
Marcel Stoetzle

marriage contract in German idealist philosophy (89–90) 6 In the industrial age, woman is freed from protection/domination through marriage while legal domination by the husband is still preserved (90) 7 Case study: the legal regulation of marriage in the German Civil Code and its reform (90–92) 8 Patriarchally disposed husbands counter the challenge to their authority through recourse to moral pressure (92–93) 9 Women can make marriage meaningful as an ethical institution only by refusing to violate their own ethical autonomy (93

in Beginning classical social theory
Abstract only
Peter John, Sarah Cotterill, Alice Moseley, Liz Richardson, Graham Smith, Gerry Stoker, and Corinne Wales

authority which attempted to facilitate volunteering by asking citizens who complain to a local authority telephone call centre to do other civic-minded acts. What do these findings imply for the challenge of promoting volunteering? By changing the choice architecture can you turn complainers into volunteers? What do we already know? How much volunteering already exists? There have been numerous policy interventions by public institutions, in the UK and internationally, to encourage volunteering. In the UK context, for example, despite the demise of Big

in Nudge, nudge, think, think (second edition)
Abstract only
Peter John, Sarah Cotterill, Alice Moseley, Liz Richardson, Graham Smith, Gerry Stoker, and Corinne Wales

Why study local inclusion? Decentralization is a common political strategy for public authorities aiming to increase citizen engagement. In theory, bringing decision-making closer to the local population reduces the costs associated with political participation because people do not have to make so much effort to attend meetings and may perceive the public authority as closer to their views and interests. However, decentralization in itself rarely manages to engage the politically marginalized as it often simply reinforces extant political

in Nudge, nudge, think, think (second edition)
Margaret Brazier and Emma Cave

, and donation of bodies to train doctors has an even greater role in saving lives and preserving health than the better known practice of organ transplantation. In this chapter, we examine how (outwith the context of transplantation) English law regulates the removal, retention and uses of human body parts and we consider briefly how far (if at all) we own our own bodies. We examine the relevant provisions of the Human Tissue Act 2004 and the role of the Human Tissue Authority (HTA). In addition we address some aspects of the role of the coroner; a key actor

in Medicine, patients and the law (sixth edition)
Guns, ships and printing presses
Torbjørn L. Knutsen

cartography. Geographers described the various countries in the world – their inhabitants, their climate, their resources – and provided important information for traders and buccaneers. Cartographers drew maps. They identified places where trade and pillage were most promising, and determined the quickest and safest routes to those places. It did not take long for descriptions and maps to provoke conflicts between lay scholars and traders on the one hand and Church authorities on the other. The scholars noted that new knowledge about the world flatly contradicted

in A history of International Relations theory (third edition)
Margaret Brazier and Emma Cave

8.1 In 2014/15, the National Health Service Litigation Authority (NHSLA) 2 received 11,497 new claims for clinical negligence, 448 fewer than in 2013/14 but nearly double the number of claims in 2009/10. 3 We have addressed the principles governing liability for clinical negligence. Formidable practical problems confront the patient bringing a claim. How can she fund a lawsuit? Whom should she sue? How quickly must she act? How do you prove negligence? What level of compensation is available? Is it worth it? There have been radical changes in the

in Medicine, patients and the law (sixth edition)
Margaret Brazier and Emma Cave

entrusted the primary responsibility for regulating the reproductive technologies in the United Kingdom to the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority (HFEA). The 1990 Act and the HFEA were once seen as the model for effective regulation of assisted conception and embryo research but the 1990 Act, and the HFEA became the subject of increasingly intense criticism. 7 It is scarcely surprising that a statute enacted in 1990 no longer met the needs of scientific developments, undreamed of twenty years before. The Act generated prolific litigation. 8 The paternalist

in Medicine, patients and the law (sixth edition)
Steven Earnshaw

humanism the growing authority of science the development of the social sciences. The interrelations and overlaps between these factors are extremely complex. I will simplify here, and offer a more nuanced assessment when we look at the Realist novels in detail. I would also warn that, taken individually, these factors do not in themselves account for the belief that the Realist novel has to deal with the contemporary. Do not forget as well that the first principle – the faithful copying of reality – might in itself imply that the writer is obliged to deal with

in Beginning realism