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Human symbols, doubled identities
Paul Carter

, Casting doubt on our weather predictions?’ ‘I am visiting my power's brother, The Diver, Whose desire, like mine, is to live in transit.’ ‘To corrupt our children by reviving old gods?’ ‘To navigate the turbulence of change.’ ‘To undermine our trust in technology

in Translations, an autoethnography
Open Access (free)
Mass violence, corpses, and the Nazi imagination of the East
Michael McConnell

civilian population. The treatment and display of corpses contributed to the expansion of mass violence between 1941 and 1944. The war against banditry The anti-partisan war allows scholars to examine the reciprocal relationship between cultural fantasy and atrocity. Unlike Nazi per­secutions of ethnic minorities such as the Jews and Roma, the anti-partisan war struck the entire population of Eastern Europe. It not only internalized these genocides, casting the victims as partisans alongside their Slavic neighbours. Efforts to eliminate resistance, perceived or otherwise

in Destruction and human remains
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Migrant poetics
Paul Carter

.’  55 The phenomenological philosopher, Maurice Merleau-Ponty proposes the existence of what he calls ‘the flesh of the world’: ‘the primordial relationship between myself and my speech’ that resembles an ‘anonymous corporeality which we share with other organisms’. 56 In this case, the function of the migrant artwork is to mobilise this primordial relationship, like the spider speculatively casting filaments into the air, simultaneously weaving a labyrinth and threading it

in Translations, an autoethnography
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Modelling, ethnography and the challenge of the anthropocene
Hannah Knox

’ which ‘catches’ relations and holds them, provisionally, in the particular relational configuration in which they are found. The result of ethnographic approaches that start from the impossibility of knowing everything at play in a social or natural situation is to deploy a method of capturing a scattered complexity and casting it across a descriptive surface. This is crucially important for understanding how ethnography, as opposed to future-oriented predictive models, operates as a method for making claims about social change. The way in which ethnography discerns

in Ethnography for a data-saturated world
Narratives of Ukrainian solo female migrants in Italy
Olena Fedyuk

and Italy apply vigorous surveillance to migrant women's behaviour, often generating strain in transnational families and casting suspicion and shame on both migrants and their families. According to Ukrainian public discourse, the very trope of motherhood, as a primary role and fulfilment for women, has been already undermined by the women's decision to migrate. However, in the case of Ukrainian migrant women, motherhood has also become a double-edged sword; on the one hand, migrant women are often seen as the transgressors of the ideal of motherhood, on the other

in Intimacy and mobility in an era of hardening borders
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Liene Ozoliņa

work with a post-structuralist conception of the subject as produced through such practices. Although Cruikshank insists that she is not casting the technologies of producing democratic citizens that she examines as either good or bad, her analysis in effect works to undo the myth of democracy as necessarily empowering.  Elizabeth Povinelli calls will ‘a quasi-mystical concept’ and argues that, rather than the will itself, we must pay attention to the ‘discursive power of the fantasy of the will’ (2011: 7). As Povinelli writes, ‘The will has long been an alibi of

in Politics of waiting
Liene Ozoliņa

everybody in the early 1990s had their life story embedded in the narrative of the nation. Rather, in those cases where one’s sense of agency was reduced because the forces of history were seen as casting aside one’s hopes and plans, it helped to tie one’s fate to that of the entire oppressed nation. This was ‘the magic of nationalism to turn chance into destiny’, to use Benedict Anderson’s words (quoted in Cerwonka 2004: 27). In Īrisa’s case, we see a similar attempt to recover the self but with different means. The 1990s, which for many Latvians came as a chance for

in Politics of waiting
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Migrant prehistory
Paul Carter

and the ultimate impact of the American Civil War on transatlantic trade. If the Carters endured the ebb and flow of enclosure, its revolution in master–tenant relations, its casting adrift from the smallholding, Joseph Terry and his Mirfield kin floated on the tides of industrialisation. His narrative is a Bildungsroman that seeks to derive a spiritual lesson from economic fluctuations. Life on the canals secured a certain independence from the social revolution occurring onshore as up and down the wool weaving valleys of the Calder and the Spen work was

in Translations, an autoethnography
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Enigmas of communication
Paul Carter

heard, of materialising as a man, of finding the track and casting a shadow finds confused expression here, as if Freud's ‘Ersatz products’, originating ‘from unsatisfied love’  11 and Borges's ‘other shapes’ emerging from the mirror (‘Little by little they will differ from us’) 12 had bred, producing hybrids, these Cooee men, antipodean centaurs, half human, half kangaroo. ‘All things would be visibly connected if one could discover at a single glance and in its

in Translations, an autoethnography
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Topologies of coexistence
Paul Carter

, and through these on socio-economic systems’; and she added, in one of those oddly self-unaware figures of speech that illustrate the poetic timelag in these matters, ‘conflicts about water, simmering for some time, have begun to heat up’. 36 Well, perhaps we could reintegrate poetry, politics and the physics of fluid dynamics by casting our prophecies on the waters again, finding our fragmentary utterances magically whirled about and rearranged to form a turbulent truth. Such word magic would not have been out of

in Translations, an autoethnography