Search results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 154 items for :

  • Manchester Shakespeare x
  • Refine by access: All content x
Clear All
Abstract only
A play that ‘approves the common liar’
Carol Chillington Rutter

of the play, what I'm calling ‘wrong-footing’, to instance more of how this play operates as a theatre machine. Antony and Cleopatra gives every director, designer and company of actors who tackle it the same set of challenges to negotiate (and opportunities to explore). In the chapters that follow, we will see them working these challenges out, making decisions that make their production's meanings. Here, I want to anticipate their struggles under four headings: dramatic structure; scenic writing; characters and casting; and six deaths

in Antony and Cleopatra
Peter Hall, Olivier Theatre, National Theatre, 1987
Carol Chillington Rutter

. Clearly, if the return to Veronese epitomised how Hall imagined Shakespeare's characters, casting Judi Dench and Anthony Hopkins as his principals signalled another attempt to get back to basics. Hall hadn't directed Dench in a Shakespeare role since Titania in A Midsummer Night's Dream in 1962 when she was still in her twenties. When he left the RSC, she stayed behind, maturing her craft under Hall's ‘heirs’, principally Trevor Nunn, and giving celebrated performances in The Winter's Tale (1969), The Merchant of Venice and The Duchess of Malfi (1971), Much Ado

in Antony and Cleopatra
Theatre, form, meme and reciprocity
John Drakakis

), p. 94. 58 Kenneth Muir, Shakespeare’s Sources , vol. 1 (London, 1957), p. 8. 59 Greenblatt, Shakespearean Negotiations , p. 112. 60 Ibid. , pp. 113–14. 61 Samuel Harsnett, A Declaration of egregious Popish Impostures, to with-draw the harts of her Maiesties Subiects from their alleagance, and from the truth of Christian Religion professed in England, vnder pretence of casting out deuils

in Shakespeare’s resources
Abstract only
John Drakakis

writing as drama requires an entirely different discipline. 5 Tóibín’s task, unlike that of Barker, is that of the adapter, of shifting narratives from one genre (classical tragedy) to another (the modern novel), engaging in what Julie Sanders describes as ‘a transpositional practice, casting a specific genre into another generic mode, an act of re-vision in itself’. 6 Tóibín clearly shares with the literate reader a recognition of the genealogy of his own narrative, but by positioning the

in Shakespeare’s resources
The Jacobean Antony and Cleopatra
Carol Chillington Rutter

fails if it wasn't practicable in production. Could the King's Men manage it with the sixteen actors who (normally) made up the company, casting Antony and Cleopatra 's forty-odd roles not just to cover doubling but to allow in that doubling for the added complication of actors blacking up? It would have taken careful plotting (along the lines of what was required of the Admiral's Men to stage George Peele's The Battle of Alcazar circa 1600). 3 But it could be done. 4

in Antony and Cleopatra
Carol Chillington Rutter

Isabella, and The Spanish Tragedy , perform sometimes incognito, sometimes in her and its own right, in subsequent theatre. When he’s casting Soliman and Perseda , Hieronimo asks rhetorically: ‘what’s a play without a woman in it?’ (IV.i.97). We might alter the question: ‘What’s a play with a woman in it? What’s the woman doing in this play?’ Isabella

in Doing Kyd

Ralph Knevet's Supplement of the Faery Queene (1635) is a narrative and allegorical work, which weaves together a complex collection of tales and episodes, featuring knights, ladies, sorcerers, monsters, vertiginous fortresses and deadly battles – a chivalric romp in Spenser's cod medieval style. The poem shadows recent English history, and the major military and political events of the Thirty Years War. But the Supplement is also an ambitiously intertextual poem, weaving together materials from mythic, literary, historical, scientific, theological, and many other kinds of written sources. Its encyclopaedic ambitions combine with Knevet's historical focus to produce an allegorical epic poem of considerable interest and power.

This new edition of Knevet's Supplement, the first scholarly text of the poem ever published, situates it in its literary, historical, biographical, and intellectual contexts. An extensive introduction and copious critical commentary, positioned at the back of the book, will enable students and scholars alike to access Knevet's complicated and enigmatic meanings, structures, and allusions.

Abstract only
Josette Bushell-Mingo’s Cleopatra, Royal Exchange, Manchester, 2005; Tarell Alvin McCraney’s ‘radical edit’, Royal Shakespeare Company, The Public and GableStage, 2013
Carol Chillington Rutter

Kings’ in ‘RSC productions’ ( Afridiziak Theatre News , 15 May 2011). But, she went on, she'd ‘yet to see a black actress play Cleopatra’ – making no mention of the fact that twenty years earlier she'd played Cleopatra. Didn't Talawa's ‘ground-breaking venture’ count? Was it too marginal to count? Was it forgotten because it produced no sudden recognition, no revolution, no change ? Or did its significance for the casting of a black Cleopatra and her Egyptians fail to register (even in Croll's memory) because it was obscured by the fact that all the parts in that

in Antony and Cleopatra
Glen Byam Shaw, Shakespeare Memorial Theatre, 1953
Carol Chillington Rutter

-related working lives that Shaw drew on to put his production team together in 1953: actors, directors and designers who'd first worked together twenty years earlier and whose careers had kept criss-crossing; colleagues who could be tapped for casting, costumes, set design. In 1935 Shaw had played Benvolio in John Gielgud's unforgettable Romeo and Juliet with Laurence Olivier and Peggy Ashcroft as the star-crossed lovers and Edith Evans as the Nurse (a production developed from their work on the play three years earlier at Oxford University that introduced the Motley design

in Antony and Cleopatra
Georgia Shakespeare 2001 and 2009
Andrew James Hartley

the matinées which are a special feature of Georgia Shakespeare’s autumn slot. But the most significant driving force was a commitment which had been made to the casting of the show long before its details took shape. This was to be a small production with a full company of only eleven (including a child Lucius who could not be doubled elsewhere), though a student intern was later added to play

in Julius Caesar