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mainland, stating that ‘there is little damage that cannot be eliminated by some glass, a new window frame, some tiles and a coat of paint’. 26 Noting newly built infrastructure such as a ‘magnificent’ refrigerated slaughterhouse, bakery and ‘luxury’ cinema ( Figure 11.1 ), he even went as far as to suggest that ‘the average value of property is probably higher now than in 1939’. 27 Seemingly, he did not wish to dishearten those who were anxiously awaiting news of home

in 'Adolf Island'
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Technique and the lives of objects in the collection
Samuel J.M.M. Alberti

galleries at the Manchester Museum’, Museum and Society, 6 (2008), 54–67. Howarth, ‘Museum cases and museum visitors’, p. 91. V. E. M. Cain, ‘Nature under Glass: Popular Science, Professional Illusion and the Transformation of American Natural History Museums, 1870–1940’ (PhD dissertation, Columbia University, 2006); A. Griffiths, Wondrous Difference: Cinema, Anthropology and Turn-of-the-Century Visual Culture (New York: Columbia University Press, 2004); J. Insley, ‘Little landscapes: dioramas in museum displays’, Endeavour, 32 (2008), 27–31; Kohler, All Creatures; L. K

in Nature and culture
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Katherine Fennelly

venues for horror and fear. Enduring public discomfort with mental illness into the modern period has, in many ways, been transferred to the material sites in which mental illness was treated. In their study of the phenomenon of dark tourism, John Lennon and Malcolm Foley cite film and television media as vehicles for popularising scenes of dark or difficult history, such as the sinking of the RMS Titanic and its portrayal in cinema throughout the twentieth century ( 2000 : 17–18). Asylums are a particularly frequent reference point in fiction. The Danvers State

in An archaeology of lunacy
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Caroline Sturdy Colls and Kevin Simon Colls

labourer known to have died. The average age at death was 25. Information about the pre-war professions of the deceased is available within death records. Most common were labourers and shoemakers. More unusual listings include a cinema mechanic (22-year-old Ivan Kutschmistrov) and a train stoker (22-year-old Fedor Pecheritsa). Interestingly, the professions of those prisoners who were ‘shot trying to escape’ include a former driver, carpenter, farmer, locksmith and a musician. All SS BB1 workers were

in 'Adolf Island'
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Caroline Sturdy Colls and Kevin Simon Colls

/30 1913 Psare, Czech Republic? Land worker Greek Orthodox Unmarried 17.6.1943 Cardiovascular weakness 15560 15 Kutschmistrov/ Kutschmistrow Ivan/Iwan 23 9.1.1920 Bulochowka, Russia Cinema mechanic Orthodox Unmarried 3.5.1943 Tuberculosis 14743

in 'Adolf Island'
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Audiences and objects
Samuel J.M.M. Alberti

, school buildings were required as military hospitals, so the town implemented a ‘two-shift’ system whereby classes from around twenty schools spent half the day outside school buildings. Children spent as much time as possible outside; or otherwise at Belle Vue Zoo, swimming, at the cinema, or attending art galleries, including the City Art Gallery, the Ancoats Museum and the Whitworth Institute.61 The Education Committee also approached the Manchester Museum for assistance, and together they constructed a scheme of classes in natural history and Egyptology, largely to

in Nature and culture