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Pictures in the margins
Author: Dolores Tierney

From 1943 until 1950, Emilio Fernández was regarded as one of the foremost purveyors of 'Mexicanness,' as one of the most important filmmakers of the Mexican film industry. This book explores the contradictions of post-Revolutionary representation as manifested in Fernández' canonical 1940s films: María Candelaria, Víctimas del pecado, Las abandonadas, La perla, Enamorada, Río Escondido, Maclovia and Salón Mexico. It examines transnational influences that shaped Fernández' work. The book acknowledges how the events of the Mexican revolution impacted on the country's film industry and the ideological development of nationalism. It takes note of current tendencies in film studies and postcolonial theory to look for the excesses, instabilities and incoherencies in texts, which challenge such totalizing projects of hegemony or cultural reification as 'cultural nationalism' or ' mexicanidad.' The book looks at how classical Mexican cinema has been studied, surveying the US studies of classical Mexican cinema which diverge from Mexican analyses by making space for the 'other' through genre and textual analyses. Fernández's Golden Age lasted for seven years, 1943-1950. The book also examines how the concept of hybridity mediates the post-Revolutionary discourse of indigenismo (indigenism) in its cinematic form. It looks specifically at how malinchismo, which is also figured as a 'positive, valorisation of whiteness,' threatens the 'purity' of an essential Mexican in María Candelaria, Emilio Fernández's most famous indigenist film. Emilio Fernandez's Enamorada deals with the Revolution's renegotiation of gender identity.

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Author: Brigitte Rollet

Coline Serreau is one of the most famous female French directors alive, not only in France but also abroad. This book is devoted not only to some relevant biographical aspects of Serreau's personal and artistic life, but also to the social, historical and political context of her debut. It deals with the 1970s' flavour of Serreau's work and more especially with the importance of politics. Taking intertextuality in its broadest sense, it assesses the strong literary influence on the tone, genre and content of Serreau's films and dramas. The book is concerned with the cinematographic genres Serreau uses. It provides a description and an analysis of Serreau's comedies, within the wider perspective of French comedies. The book also deals with the element of 'family' or community which is recurrent in Serreau's films and plays. During the 1980s, Serreau's career moved towards fiction, and she worked both for the cinema and the theatre. Serreau often underlines her family's lack of financial resources. The book considers the specificity of French cinema in the 1970s before analysing in more detail Serreau's first film. Serreau's work on stage and on big or small screens was strongly influenced by the political mood which succeeded May '68 in France. The book also discusses the idea of utopia which was the original theme of Serreau' first documentary and which is central to her first fiction film, Pourquoi pas!. Female humour and laughter cannot be considered without another powerful element: the motivation of often transgressive laughter.

The history of classical Mexican cinema and its scholarship
Dolores Tierney

This chapter looks at how classical Mexican cinema has been studied. It examines how Mexican analyses of classical Mexican cinema privilege the subjects of cultural practices and consequently disadvantage the film texts themselves. It challenges local nontextual perspectives which characterize Mexican cinema as ‘underdeveloped’ and suggests a means of reading against an approach that continually

in Emilio Fernández
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Soviet montage and the American cinematic avant-garde
Barnaby Haran

3 Kino in America: Soviet montage and the American cinematic avant-garde Alongside the radical Constructivism of the New Playwrights Theatre, the American avant-garde’s most sympathetic engagement with Soviet revolutionary culture was in cinema. If the innovations of Vsevolod Meyerhold’s Constructivist theatre stimulated the NPT, then the development of cinematic montage by his protégé Sergei Eisenstein, alongside Lev Kuleshov, Dziga Vertov, Vsevolod Pudovkin, and Alexander Dovzhenko, had an analogous impact upon American avant-garde cinema. The Soviet film

in Watching the red dawn

The issue of ethnicity in France, and how ethnicities are represented there visually, remains one of the most important and polemical aspects of French post-colonial politics and society. This is the first book to analyse how a range of different ethnicities have been represented across contemporary French visual culture. Via a wide series of case studies – from the worldwide hit film Amélie to France’s popular TV series Plus belle la vie – it probes how ethnicities have been represented across different media, including film, photography, television and the visual arts. Four chapters examine distinct areas of particular importance: national identity, people of Algerian heritage, Jewishness and France’s second city Marseille.

Futurist cinema as metamedium
Carolina Fernández Castrillo

17 Rethinking interdisciplinarity: Futurist cinema as metamedium Carolina Fernández Castrillo Carolina Fernández Castrillo Rethinking interdisciplinarity Some of the most innovative artistic expressions at the beginning of the twentieth century came from the Futurist desire for provocation and rupture with tradition. After many unsuccessful attempts at the end of the nineteenth century, Futurism tried to formulate new strategies to reflect the transition of society and the arts to modernity. Its project consisted of an integral restructuring of the universe

in Back to the Futurists
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Coline Serreau and politics (1972–96)
Brigitte Rollet

twenty years are also evident in her own evolution as a filmmaker and dramatist. Like many other directors, she has chosen different ways of expressing this desire for ‘something different’ to be found in the ‘political’, ‘militant’ or ‘activist’ films which flourished in the 1970s. Her singularity lies not so much in the genres she opted for, but in her very personal way of exploiting them to create an original work. This chapter will consider the specificity of French cinema in the 1970s before analysing in more detail Serreau

in Coline Serreau
Brigitte Rollet

, for television and cinema) and writing simultaneously. In 1971 she collaborated with the radical stand-up comedian Coluche in both the writing andthe acting of the show Thérèse est triste, performing mainly in the fringe cabaret setting of the café-théâtres which flourished in Paris at the time thanks in large part to their iconoclastic humour. At the same time, she was acting for television and cinema, sometimes writing the script and/or the dialogues such as in Jean-Louis Bertuccelli’s film On s’est trompé d’histoire d

in Coline Serreau
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Mexican cinema and Emilio Fernández post the Golden Age – from golden boy to ‘the man in black’
Dolores Tierney

Mexican film industry in the 1950s The decade of the 1950s was a period of breakdown in Mexican cinema, when both the ideological – i.e., the political institution of the Revolution as it passed from Alemán to Adolfo Ruíz Cortines (1952–58) – and institutional ‘systems’ of Mexican classical filmmaking began to fall apart (Berg, 1992 : 37). 2 This institutional failure in Mexican cinema had been

in Emilio Fernández
Rethinking art, media, and the audio-visual contract
Author: Ming-Yuen S. Ma

There is no soundtrack is a specific yet expansive study of sound tactics deployed in experimental media art today. It analyses how audio and visual elements interact and produce meaning, drawing from works by contemporary media artists ranging from Chantal Akerman, to Nam June Paik, to Tanya Tagaq. It then links these analyses to discussions on silence, voice, noise, listening, the soundscape, and other key ideas in sound studies. In making these connections, the book argues that experimental media art – avant-garde film, video art, performance, installation, and hybrid forms – produces radical and new audio-visual relationships that challenge and destabilize the visually-dominated fields of art history, contemporary art criticism, cinema and media studies, and cultural studies as well as the larger area of the human sciences. This book directly addresses what sound studies scholar Jonathan Sterne calls ‘visual hegemony’. It joins a growing body of interdisciplinary scholarship that is collectively sonifying the study of culture while defying the lack of diversity within the field by focusing on practitioners from transnational and diverse backgrounds. Therefore, the media artists discussed in this book are of interest to scholars and students who are exploring aurality in related disciplines including gender and feminist studies, queer studies, ethnic studies, postcolonial studies, urban studies, environmental analysis, and architecture. As such, There Is No Soundtrack makes meaningful connections between previously disconnected bodies of scholarship to build new, more complex and reverberating frameworks for the study of art, media, and sound.