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Abstract only
Lindsey Dodd

the best army in the world, we’re the strongest and our generals are very skilful.’ But I do think that the people who said that – and I remember our father said that – they didn’t really seem to believe it. They themselves didn’t believe it. I  felt that we’d won in 1914, but this time no. We’d seen German propaganda, we used to go to the cinema to see the news, and we saw Nuremburg, the Germans, their discipline, their ceremonies, and it made us afraid, eh! I’m not making this up, not at all. Because as a child I was very, very attentive. And when in 1940 on 10

in French children under the Allied bombs, 1940–45
Abstract only
Lindsey Dodd

evident in this tale of other people’s deaths. The children’s mother died in front of them, and they were powerless to save her. The deaths of his friends during the air raid on Boulogne-Billancourt of April 1943 also had direct personal relevance to Robert Belleuvre, in his story of survival through luck, fate and decision-making. On his way to the Petit Jaurès cinema, Robert bumped into three school friends: They were going to the other cinema. ‘Are you coming, Robert? We’re off to the Rond-point.’ ‘Oh’, I said, ‘No. I’m going this way.’ ‘No, come on! Come with us!’ I

in French children under the Allied bombs, 1940–45
Abstract only
A conclusion
Lindsey Dodd

behaviours resulting from bombing; perhaps women remembered them more clearly, or admitted to past ‘weakness’ more openly. But not only girls experienced behavioural responses. Max Potter, for example, mentioned being afraid to sleep alone in his bed as a teenager. Men’s narration was more likely to stall when describing fear. Michel Jean-Bart and Pierre Haigneré both became distressed in the interview when recounting the moment of bombing. Robert Belleuvre was upset when speaking of his friends’ deaths on their way to the cinema in Boulogne-Billancourt and Bernard Bauwens

in French children under the Allied bombs, 1940–45
Lindsey Dodd

, beliefs and ultimately behaviour. Sometimes the audience is alive to the manipulation, sometimes it is not. Poor propaganda bounces off its intended recipients, leaving them unchanged  – or unchanged in the desired way. In many cases people, including children, engaged with propaganda, accepting or rejecting the messages they received. The propagandists’ messages were subject to mutations wrought by competing information and the way that each individual processed them. Anti-Allied propaganda The output of press, radio and cinema in the Occupied Zone was controlled by

in French children under the Allied bombs, 1940–45
Lindsey Dodd

broadcasts from London. The team from ‘The French speak to the French’ and de Gaulle’s spokesman Maurice Schumann were household names for the Thomas brothers. Andréa Cousteaux remarked that listening to the BBC was habitual in her house, but only the evening news, as it was so difficult to hear clearly over the jamming, and too dangerous to risk for long. German and collaborationist explanations of bombing in radio and cinema news were more accessible. Yet some families spurned them outright. Cécile Bramé said that if they wanted to know what was going on, ‘we wouldn

in French children under the Allied bombs, 1940–45
Lindsey Dodd

bombing was interpreted was affected by the child’s disposition or temperament as well. A  tendency towards curiosity, braveness, timidity or resilience made a difference to behaviour and response. People’s own perceptions of their power to act also matter in their subjective interpretations of events. To feel that one had made a good decision, or been smiled upon by fate or luck or blessed by God could help individuals come to terms with disturbing memories. Robert Belleuvre’s good decision not to go to the Petit-Jaurès cinema on 4 April 1943 helped him accept the

in French children under the Allied bombs, 1940–45
Abstract only
Same city but a different place?
Madeleine Leonard

for its shopping, eating and cinema facilities on a day-to-day basis. Situated by Belfast Lough and near the Cave Hill, you are never too far from the splendid scenery that the country has to offer. There is vast countryside, mountainside views while in the city coupled with the varied, cultured architecture. These complements add to Belfast’s cityscape

in Teens and territory in ‘post-conflict’ Belfast
Adrian Millar

go to the cinema in the Protestant Donegal Road area of the city and would leave the cinema early in ‘defiance of “the Queen”’ (Gerry Adams, Before the Dawn (London: Heinemann, 1996), p. 48), i.e. skipping the playing of the British national anthem, with local people chasing after them. He says his defiance was ‘instinctive’ ( ibid ., p. 48), and had nothing to

in Socio-ideological fantasy and the Northern Ireland conflict
The impact of the First World War on the 1918–19 influenza pandemic in Ulster
Patricia Marsh

and trench fever consequent on the demobilisation and return of troops serving abroad. 62 Although most local authorities recommended the closure of day, Sunday and technical schools, they lacked the authority to make it compulsory. Several councils wanted to close cinemas to the public, but again this action was not sanctioned by the LGBI. 63 In reality official bodies

in Medicine, health and Irish experiences of conflict 1914–45
Understanding state responses to terrorism in Egypt
Dina Al Raffie

‘shalom’ is exchanged and they part ways; again suggesting Jewish/Israeli complicity in the Islamist terrorist phenomenon. Another feature of this and many later films is the lack of engagement with the ideological element of terrorism. This slightly changed in the 1990s when a connection was suggested between religious extremism and poverty, the lack of opportunities or else brainwashing by other extremists. Overall, however, few serious attempts have been made in Egyptian cinema to critically examine the religious discourse underlying terrorist ideology or the

in Non-Western responses to terrorism