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John M. Mackenzie

Volunteer field days, at exhibitions, tattoos, royal tournaments, and eventually in the cinema. Melodrama was gone by the early 1920s, surviving only in opera and burlesque. 2 In fact it had taken up residence elsewhere, on film. Above all, the old patriotic and imperialist music hall died with the First World War, and for many commentators its passing marks the end of popular cultural imperialism. 3 But again, popular imperialism

in Propaganda and Empire
The manipulation of British Public Opinion, 1880–1960

Imperial history and the imperial idea have been examined almost entirely in a centrifugal manner, as the radiation of influences from Britain into its wider hinterland. This book explores the manifestations of the imperial idea, from the trappings of royalty through writers like G. A. Henty to the humble cigarette card. It uses popular imperialism as a focus for the examination of the theatre, the cinema, education, juvenile literature, imperial exhibitions, youth movements, and a variety of imperial propaganda bodies between the mid-nineteenth and mid-twentieth centuries. The most aggressive and innovative advertisers of the day were companies dependent on the imperial economic nexus, in tea, chocolate, soaps and oils, tobacco, meat extracts, shipping, and later rubber. Middle and upper-class attachment to the music hall developed out of its success among the working class. Radio conveyed a sense of the unity of Empire, at least in the public mind, such as the Edwardian imperial societies had found unattainable. After the Second World War the British Broadcasting Corporation (B.B.C.) continued to present a vision of a beneficent and regenerative Empire. The great exhibitions which from the 1880s came to be dominated by the imperial theme offer the most striking examples of both conscious and unconscious approaches to imperial propaganda. By the 1880s the new morality had come to be wedded to the late nineteenth-century world view and was suffused with the patriotic, racial, and militarist elements which together made up the new popular imperialism.

Bronwen Everill

-based affiliations. These societies operated as welfare insurance, covering sickness and funeral costs, but also providing ‘excursions and picnics; concerts, singing, dancing and drumming; religious talks and discussions, literacy classes, debates, and cinema shows; first-aid service; initiation ceremonies for new members; and the laying of wreaths on graves of former members’. 56 The colonial government looked

in Humanitarianism, empire and transnationalism, 1760–1995
Nursing leaders of the League of Red Cross Societies between the wars
Melanie Oppenheimer

revealing ‘vision, initiative, originality’ in child welfare clinics, health demonstrations, new public health nursing services, newspapers and magazine articles, using the cinema for lectures: their work was described as ‘unlimited’ and often carried out ‘in the face of unexpected disappointments and discouragements’. 71 Other duties of the nursing director included overseeing the League’s Public

in Humanitarianism, empire and transnationalism, 1760–1995
Popular imperialism in France
Martin Thomas

. Yet evaluating popular imperialism in inter-war France is none the less problematic. The most interesting and frequently used evidence is representational. It ranges from analyses of colonial exhibitions, museums and the proliferation of colonial or colonial-inspired art and literature to the proliferation of colonial themes in popular cinema and French advertising. 2 The beginnings

in The French empire between the wars
Jeffrey Richards

Myths and stereotypes are the essential elements of popular culture. They are far easier for audiences to identify and absorb than complex analyses of issues and historical problems. The myths and stereotypes of Ireland and Irishness are as potent and indeed politically influential as any. They have a long history and the cinema is only the latest vehicle for their

in ‘An Irish Empire’?
Films and the end of empire
Jeffrey Richards

imperial honours were awarded twice a year. The history and meaning of the Empire has long been conveyed by the cinema. The 1930s had seen a flourishing genre of imperial films produced both in Britain and in Hollywood. There were romanticised biopics of imperial heroes: Clive of India (1935), Rhodes of Africa (1936), Stanley and Livingstone (1939). There were the classic celebrations of the

in British culture and the end of empire
Abstract only
Angela McCarthy

round camp like a dog;/Do me best Oi niver can plaze them,/For they’re eternally sthoppin’ me grog!’ 29 Cartoons in New Zealand also endeavoured to mockingly reproduce the Irish way of speaking English, and in doing so poke fun at supposed Irish stupidity, as evident from Figure 3 . New Zealand cinema also contains examples of the mocking of an Irish brogue, with the earliest portrayal of an Irish

in Scottishness and Irishness in New Zealand since 1840
John M. Mackenzie

Marketing Board, the great exhibitions, including those on the Continent, and the use of the full range of propaganda techniques, the cinema, ephemera, lectures, slides, film strips, and special exhibits. Before the Institute could find this new purpose, however, it had to weather a succession of storms. Following the Dominions Royal Commission of 1917, a report was prepared by a committee under the

in Propaganda and Empire
Abstract only
John M. Mackenzie

imperial propaganda through advertising and other marketing techniques. Sources of popular entertainment like the music hall and later the cinema embraced the new imperial nationalism, while juvenile literature and publishers’ lists generally found the imperial adventure tradition socially and politically acceptable, as well as immensely popular. In other words, a wide variety of non-governmental agencies

in Propaganda and Empire