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The speaker, his soul, and the poem as stage
Angelika Zirker

conventions of comedy rather than tragedy through their happy endings: hence, one might also call these miniature dramas divine comedies . The generic contexts associated with drama are further reflected in the form of the sonnet itself. Donne’s Holy Sonnets mostly end happily (or with a positive outlook, e.g. Holy Sonnet ‘Batter my Heart’), either in that the speaker finds grace, a way towards redemption, or in that death is overcome

in William Shakespeare and John Donne
The Merchant of Venice, Measure for Measure, Twelfth Night
Richard Hillman

As this chapter’s title is meant to signal, I propose to treat three comedies dating from between 1596 (roughly) and 1604 as varied experiments in tragicomedy. To this extent, they anticipate the formal generic turn of the final plays, but they are far from achieving the distinctive synthesis of tragic and comic strains which the latter establish (while exhibiting, of course, their own variations). Instead, the notion of tragicomedy that broadly applies here involves a more or less uneasy juxtaposition of fulfilled comic patterns with an affirmation of tragic

in The Shakespearean comic and tragicomic
Nigel Wood

But we know we are watching a comedy, so such scepticism is presumably diluted by the inexorability of the fortunate ending; Puck provides an apology for any offending ‘shadows’ – or unskilful actors – and the ‘visions’ they have offered that can now safely appear but a ‘weak and idle theme’ true only of dreams (5.1.417–21). Seasoned theatregoers

in The Renaissance of emotion
Rachel Willie

5 Ideas of panegyric in early Restoration comedy Then to Westminster-hall where I heard how the Parliament had this day dissolved themselfs and did pass very cheerfully through the Hall and the Speaker without his Mace. The whole Hall was joyful thereat, as well as themselfs, and now they begin to talk loud of the king. Tonight I am told that yesterday, about 5 a-clock in the afternoon, one came with a ladder to the great Exchange and wiped with a brush the Inscripcion that was upon King Charles, and that there was a great bonefire made in the Exchange and

in Staging the revolution
H. B. Charlton
Bulletin of the John Rylands Library
Abstract only
H. B. Charlton
Bulletin of the John Rylands Library
Gillian Avery
Bulletin of the John Rylands Library
T. B L Webster
Bulletin of the John Rylands Library
T. B L Webster
Bulletin of the John Rylands Library
Bulletin of the John Rylands Library