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Carmen Mangion

say goodbye to them and I remember being taken to a door … the Novice Mistress said ‘You are now going into enclosure.’ Well. So I raised my body, straightened my back and thought ‘This is it’ … and in I went but I can’t remember feeling happy, not even sad, I wasn’t homesick or anything um because you know this, I was coming home, home. 23 But, of course, the ministries of teaching, nursing and parish work usually required sisters to leave their convent spaces. When outside the convent, enclosure was consciously performed in embodied ways: through distance and

in Catholic nuns and sisters in a secular age
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Carmen M. Mangion

de Mirepoix, the mother prioress, and ordered the evacuation of the cloister. Twenty-nine nuns, eight lay sisters, two servants and two chaplains left Dieppe, France, on 16 October 1792 aboard the Prince of Wales. They remained in temporary quarters in London until they found a suitable residence at Bodney Hall, near Brandon, Norfolk, in March 1793.59 They were just one of twenty-three communities that fled the continent to England during the period 1792–1800. Nineteen were English communities cominghome’. Each community had its own story of the difficulties of

in Contested identities
Cara Delay

1935, the Public Dance Halls Act not only required the licensing of dance hall spaces but also allowed for police to inspect them at will.75 Newspapers in the following months and years detailed ongoing debates about dance halls, demonstrating how influential the Catholic clergy were in either sanctioning or forbidding them. In September 1935, the Irish Examiner published an article focusing on the potential granting of a dance-hall licence in Dingle. The local Catholic priests objected to the licence ‘on moral grounds’ because it meant that ‘young people were coming

in Irish women and the creation of modern Catholicism, 1850–1950
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Cara Delay

landscape, Catholic ritual, and community life. A County Longford woman remembered: I mean the Church was the center of your day – of your life – and nobody would ever think of missing Mass and then where there would be a houseful, one would stay at home to mind the house and do the things … You walked to Mass, everybody walked to Mass. But the people was used to walking and they were good at it – people wouldn’t bring a bicycle to Mass. They liked … ­especially the coming home part, they liked the chat …110 Mass attendance also emerged as central to women’s communities

in Irish women and the creation of modern Catholicism, 1850–1950