Search results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 31 items for :

  • "coming home" x
  • Manchester Studies in Imperialism x
  • Refine by access: All content x
Clear All
Appropriation, dehumanisation and the rule of colonial difference
Samraghni Bonnerjee

. 8 See Kate Ariotti, Captive Anzacs: Australian POWs of the Ottomans during the First World War (Melbourne: Cambridge University Press, 2018); Santanu Das (ed.), Race, Empire and First World War Writing (New York: Cambridge University Press, 2011). 9 Romain Fathi and Bart Ziino, ‘Coming home: Australians’ sorties de guerre after the First World War’, History Australia , 16

in Exiting war
Romain Fathi, Margaret Hutchison, Andrekos Varnava, and Michael J. K. Walsh

-Rouzeau and Christophe Prochasson, Sortir de la Grande Guerre. Le monde et l’apres 1918 (Paris: Tallandier, 2008). For a historiographical review of sorties de guerre , see Cosima Flateau, ‘Les sorties de guerre. Une introduction’, Les Cahiers Sirice , 17:3 (2016), 5–14. 11 Romain Fathi and Bart Ziino, ‘Coming home: Australians’ sorties de guerre after the First World War’, History Australia , 16:1 (2019), 5

in Exiting war
Trevor Harris

Details of numbers of New Zealand servicemen who returned during and after the war can be consulted at https://nzhistory.govt.nz/war/public-service-at-war/repatriation-of-returned-servicemen (accessed 3 March 2021). 13 On Australia's ‘exit’ from the war, for example, see Romain Fathi and Bart Ziino, ‘Coming home: Australians’ sorties de guerre after the First World War’, History Australia , 16:1 (2019), 5–19. The process of

in Exiting war
Hannah Mawdsley

McCracken and Curson, ‘Flu downunder’, pp. 112–14. 61 Ibid ., p. 116. For more on the return of Australian troops after the war, see Romain Fathi and Bart Ziino, ‘Coming home: Australians’ sorties de guerre after the First World War’, History Australia , 16:1 (2019), 5–19. 62

in Exiting war
Charles-Philippe Courtois

). 2 On this notion, see Cosima Flateau, ‘Les sorties de guerre. Une introduction’, Les Cahiers Sirice , 17:3 (2016), 5–14; Romain Fathi and Bart Ziino, ‘Coming home: Australians’ sorties de guerre after the First World War’, History Australia , 16:1 (2019), 5–19. 3 Réal Bélanger, Henri Bourassa. Le fascinant destin d’un homme libre (1868–1914) (Québec: Presses de l’université Laval

in Exiting war
Understanding Britain’s 1918–20 moment in the Middle East
Clothilde Houot

–1922 (London: Macmillan, 1981). 7 Bruno Cabanes and Guillaume Piketty, ‘Sortir de la guerre: Jalons pour une histoire en chantier’, Histoire@Politique , 3 (March 2007), 1 ; Romain Fathi and Bart Ziino, ‘Coming home: Australians’ sorties de guerre after the First World War’, History Australia , 16:1 (2009), 5–19; Flateau, ‘La sortie de guerre de l’Empire ottoman’, pp. 29

in Exiting war
Abstract only
Family legacies: after abolition
Katie Donington

been there for centuries. I was coming home. I am the sugar at the bottom of the English cup of tea. I am the sweet tooth, the sugar plantations that rotted generations of English children’s teeth … That is the outside history that is inside the history of the English. There is no English history without that other history. 33

in The bonds of family
The ‘rude awakenings’ of the Windrush era
Stuart Ward

routes which made the wealth of London, Marseilles, Bristol, Bordeaux, Cadiz, Seville and Lisbon. Europe’s chickens were coming home to roost! 37 That such instinctive awareness of the proximity of past ‘horrors’ could coexist (often in the same individual testimony) with naïve expectations of British

in The break-up of Greater Britain
Open Access (free)
West Indian intellectual
Helen Carr

his Coming, Coming Home. Conversations II (St Martin: House of Nehesi, 2000), p. 24. 23 Stuart Hall, ‘The formation of a diasporic intellectual’, in David Morley and Kuan-Hsing Chen (eds), Stuart Hall: critical dialogues in cultural studies (London: Routledge, 1996), p. 501

in West Indian intellectuals in Britain
Abstract only
Marjory Harper

themselves return migrants, virtually all the recruits were women, many of whom welcomed the opportunity to travel, at the same time as pursuing a career in teaching, medicine or church work. 30 They were generally open-minded about their future intentions. Some reflected Wyman’s template of return migration by coming home to fulfil family responsibilities, while others, in a manner reminiscent of Robert McLeese from north Antrim, came home only briefly as part of the rite of passage that led to permanent emigration. The

in Emigrant homecomings