Search results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 10 items for :

  • "coming home" x
  • Manchester History of Medicine x
  • Refine by access: All content x
Clear All
British POW medics’ memoirs of the Second World War
Carol Acton and Jane Potter

Ministry … explaining that [POWs’] experiences had caused them to be slightly unbalanced. Not too much was to be expected of us and great patience had to be exercised. The letter did not help our rehabilitation and caused most of our relatives to view me with a kind of compassionate apprehension.’126 As Allport suggests: ‘Perhaps the POW experience was so alienating because it defied the national narrative of victory.’127 Thus MacCarthy was right to use the plural pronoun when he declared, ‘Now, with some reluctance, we faced life again’.128 Adams described coming home

in Working in a world of hurt
Julian M. Simpson

treatment of patients see R. Bivins, ‘Cominghome” to (post) colonial medicine: Treating tropical bodies in post-war Britain, Social History of Medicine, 26:1 (2013) ’. Bivins further explores the interactions between the development of the NHS, imperial legacies and migrant patients in Contagious Communities. 3 However, see Jones & Snow, Against the Odds, pp. 6–​22. 4 E. W. Said, Culture and Imperialism (London: Vintage Books, 1994), pp. xxii–​x xiii. 5 Bivins, ‘Cominghome”’. 83 Empire, migration and the NHS83 6 See E. Consterdine, ‘Community versus

in Migrant architects of the NHS
Abstract only
Workplace and suburban neurosis in the interwar period
Jill Kirby

: She cooked a desultory dinner of one course; walked up and down the shopping street three or four afternoons a week with the baby strapped into the pram, the elder child dragging beside her; went to the park once a week, speaking to no one and coming home early because the elder child was fretful: knew no one except for a passing acquaintance with the grocer's wife round the corner, and her in-laws, with whom she was on the defensive and did not find herself in sympathy. 73 Another couple

in Feeling the strain
Abstract only
Civilian nerves in the Second World War
Jill Kirby

. 101 Ibid . 102 Alan Allport, Demobbed: Coming Home after the Second World War (New Haven; London: Yale University Press, 2009), p. 196. Allport suggests that the War Office was keen to define psychological casualties as victims of pre-existing constitutional weakness rather than of military service in order to deny thousands of war pension claims. 103 Roffey Park Institute Ltd, ‘Courses at Roffey Park’. 104 NCRIW, ‘Record of Two Years’ Progress’. £5 per week was a ‘respectable working

in Feeling the strain
Jane Brooks

Times (1  December 1945): 801. 89 Anonymous, ‘Editorial: Coming ­home – ­Army nurses think of demobilisation’, Nursing Times (16 February 1946): 127. 90 Anonymous, ‘Editorial: Nursing goes forward’, Nursing Times (17 November 1945): 751. Italics in the original. 91 Anonymous, ‘Editorial: For the good of all’, 41–2. 92 Starns, Nurses at War, 150. 93 Karen Flynn, ‘Proletarianization, professionalization and Caribbean immigrant nurses’, Canadian Woman Studies 18, 1 (1998): 57–60; Julia Hallam, Nursing the Image: Media, Culture and Professional Identity (London

in Negotiating nursing
Steven King

-parish paupers were often eager to emphasise their belonging by cominghome’ periodically as we saw above) or sequentially, as did Olive Barber. It seems unlikely that their rhetorical and strategic approaches would have been very different in either forum. By the same token, some of those applying to vestries did so by note or advocate, stressing that they were too ill to attend in person, a common enough claim among out-parish letter writers as well. Moreover, both in- and out-parish paupers faced two shared conundrums – how to navigate entitlement in a system where there

in Sickness, medical welfare and the English poor, 1750–1834
Abstract only
Doctors and medics in the Vietnam War
Carol Acton and Jane Potter

admits trying ‘to put on a facade of happiness’.58 While Holley is never wounded in spite of spending six months in a dangerous combat environment, he writes to Sondra towards the end of his tour that he ‘may not have a Purple Heart … but I am coming home with a bruised and broken heart’.59 The comparison with Wilfred Owen’s ‘foreheads of 191 Working in a world of hurt men have bled where no wounds were’ is inevitable here. Holley’s private acknowledgement to his wife, so astutely captured in his image of feeling ‘held together by Scotch Tape’, reveals the wounds

in Working in a world of hurt
Abstract only
Carol Acton and Jane Potter

the environment precipitates a breakdown for Captain Marie: ‘I broke down. I never cried so much in my life. After I left the patient I fell apart … everything here was normal … That’s when I said to myself, “Nobody knows what’s going on over there. Nobody knows all the pain that we have, all the sadness, all the loneliness, all the misery.” ’75 And later: ‘I was glad about coming home. But when you come home it’s like the whole world doesn’t see what’s going on over there.’76 In spite of what would appear to be a greater recognition on the part of veterans and the

in Working in a world of hurt
Abstract only
A news perspective
Ida Milne

little is known. It is suggested that soldiers coming home on leave may have brought it from the front. But it first appeared in Spain, and one has not heard that it was prevalent in France, though a far-​ fetched explanation of the present German inactivity on the Western front is the suggestion that the enemy is suffering from influenza. Others blame the war for the outbreak, and many with more show of  23 T he flu :  a news perspective 23 reason, attribute it to the general food scarcity and the short commons to which all have to submit with the subsequent

in Stacking the coffins
Open Access (free)
Managing diabetes, managing medicine
Martin D. Moore

emergence and policy convergence’. 157 A. Hardy, ‘Beriberi, Vitamin B1 and world food policy, 1925–1970’, Medical History , 39:1 (1995), 61–77. Historically, such movements were also tied with colonial medicine: R. Bivins, ‘Cominghome” to (post)colonial medicine: treating tropical bodies in post-war Britain’, Social History of Medicine , 26:1 (2013), 1–20. See also Sheard, The Passionate Economist . 158 Day et al., A Comparative US – UK Study of Guidelines . 159 Private, direct-pay healthcare

in Managing diabetes, managing medicine