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The Armorial of Bianca Maria Sforza, Copied for August of Saxony by Lucas Cranach the Younger (Manchester, John Rylands Library, German MS. 2)
Ben Pope

German MS. 2 is a previously unstudied armorial dating from the mid-sixteenth century. This article shows that it was produced in the workshop of Lucas Cranach the Younger for Elector August of Saxony, and that it was copied from an earlier armorial of c.1500 which was kept in Cranach’s workshop, probably as reference material. Much of the original content and structure of this ‘old armorial’ has been preserved in Rylands German 2. On this basis, the original armorial can be located in a late fifteenth-century Upper German tradition of armorial manuscripts known as the ‘Bodensee’ group. It was also closely linked to the Habsburg dynasty, and appears to have been dedicated to Empress Bianca Maria Sforza. The armorial therefore opens significant new perspectives on the relationships between artists and heraldry and between women and heraldic knowledge, and on ways of visualising the Holy Roman Empire through heraldry.

Bulletin of the John Rylands Library
An Annotated Bibliography
David Hayton

Sir Lewis Namier (1888–1960) was not only a major twentieth-century historian, a pioneer of ‘scientific history’ who gave his name to a particular form of history-writing, but an important public intellectual. He played a significant role in public affairs, as an influential adviser to the British Foreign Office during the First World War and later as an active Zionist. This article offers a new perspective on his life and work by providing, for the first time, as comprehensive a bibliography as is currently possible of his voluminous writings: books, scholarly articles and contributions to periodicals and newspapers, including many hitherto unknown, and some published anonymously. The annotation includes not only bibliographical information but explanations and brief summaries of the content. The introduction gives an account of Namier’s life and an assessment of his significance as a historian and thinker.

Bulletin of the John Rylands Library
Hayyim Rothman

‘throws flirtatious glances at whomever can be more or less useful (Zalkind 1920q ).’  11 He or she weighs decisions ‘not according to their ethical content, but according to their superficial results (Zalkind 1922b ),’ forging alliances at the expense of ethical consistency and moral principle. This conclusion added a new dimension to Zalkind's critique of Zionist diplomacy. He denounced the movement's leadership for ‘walking hand in hand with the blackest reactionaries rather than acting as a

in No masters but God
Abstract only
Joseph Hardwick

.greenanglicans.org/a-prayer-for-australia/ ; www.baptist.org.au/wp-content/uploads/2020/01/Prayer-for-Australian-Bushfire-Crisis_January-2020.pdf (all accessed 22 May 2020).

in Prayer, providence and empire
Abstract only
Carmen M. Mangion

chapter will argue, on evanglisation. This does not imply that the work of women religious was without contemplative content. Many nineteenth-century women religious found the ‘sustenance’ to perform their ‘works of mercy’ firmly rooted in their spirituality. 112 Working identities following the directives of the Catholic hierarchy.3 At times, credit for their achievements has been assumed to belong to male colleagues or ecclesiastical officials. However, as will be seen in the next two chapters, the contribution of Catholic women religious to nineteenth

in Contested identities
David Geiringer

commission members separated into groups to discuss the implications of what had been said, and de Locht paced the balcony clutching his rosary. 2 Häring had, in fact, understated the significance of de Locht’s challenge; it called in to question not only the content of Catholic sexual theology, but also the processes through which this theology was constructed. The exchange between the two therefore

in The Pope and the pill
Abstract only
Contemporary relevance
Hayyim Rothman

power’ that consists in its ‘astrological’ ability to discern the fragments of history that, in conjunction with the present, form a redemptive ‘constellation’ and thus illuminate the future (Benjamin 1968 ). This is to say that the past is also pregnant with form and content waiting to be delivered. If history often serves an ideological function because it is generally written by the victor (Benjamin 2003 , 406), retelling it from another point of view serves a utopian function; expanding the horizons of political imagination, it becomes a subversive act

in No masters but God
Joseph Hardwick

science and controversies over whether prayer could have physical results, for instance in bringing fair weather or rain. Beyond this, two generalisations can be made about church services. First, special services became more accessible for those who did not regularly attend Sunday worship; the laity also increasingly played active roles in organising and contributing to the content of services. Second, in the early twentieth century non-Anglican Protestant denominations that had a tradition of extemporary prayer increasingly

in Prayer, providence and empire
Hayyim Rothman

faithful open soul’ of the people that ‘was, not long ago, in harmony with the stormy-spirited expression of struggle had been shaken to its foundation (Steinberg 1927a , 18)’ — ‘the moral content of October’ having been ‘enslaved to a … state-party’ that regarded itself as ‘sole embodiment of historical reason’ and which was prepared to lift the proverbial tablets of the revolution ‘over the heads of the people’ and strike them with those same tablets. Thus, a ‘sanctification of God's name thus becomes a desecration thereof (Steinberg 1951a , 156).’ Let us examine

in No masters but God
Cara Delay

other Tales’.105 women and catholic culture 33 Almost as popular, and equally as central to constructing and enforcing religious gender norms, were national newspapers such as the Freeman’s Journal and regional newspapers including the Galway Pilot and Vindicator, Clare Journal, and Munster News, which dutifully reported on Church events. Members of the Catholic hierarchy wrote a substantial number of articles, columns, poems, stories, and editorials for these newspapers. Much of this content underscored women’s proper roles. Letters to the editor, advertisements

in Irish women and the creation of modern Catholicism, 1850–1950