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James Baldwin and Ray Charles in “The Hallelujah Chorus”
Ed Pavlić

Based on a recent, archival discovery of the script, “But Amen is the Price” is the first substantive writing about James Baldwin’s collaboration with Ray Charles, Cicely Tyson, and others in a performance of musical and dramatic pieces. Titled by Baldwin, “The Hallelujah Chorus” was performed in two shows at Carnegie Hall in New York City on 1 July 1973. The essay explores how the script and presentation of the material, at least in Baldwin’s mind, represented a call for people to more fully involve themselves in their own and in each other’s lives. In lyrical interludes and dramatic excerpts from his classic work, “Sonny’s Blues,” Baldwin addressed divisions between neighbors, brothers, and strangers, as well as people’s dissociations from themselves in contemporary American life. In solo and ensemble songs, both instrumental and vocal, Ray Charles’s music evinced an alternative to the tradition of Americans’ evasion of each other. Charles’s sound meant to signify the history and possibility of people’s attainment of presence in intimate, social, and political venues of experience. After situating the performance in Baldwin’s personal life and public worldview at the time and detailing the structure and content of the performance itself, “But Amen is the Price” discusses the largely negative critical response as a symptom faced by much of Baldwin’s other work during the era, responses that attempted to guard “aesthetics” generally—be they literary, dramatic, or musical—as class-blind, race-neutral, and apolitical. The essay presents “The Hallelujah Chorus” as a key moment in Baldwin’s search for a musical/literary form, a way to address, as he put it, “the person and the people,” in open contention with the social and political pressures of the time.

James Baldwin Review
The presence of the book in prose fiction
Author: Glyn White

This book constructs a vocabulary for the literary study of graphic textual phenomena. It examines the typographic devices within a very particular context: that of the interpretation of prose fiction. The graphic surface of the page is a free two-dimensional space on which text appears either mechanically or consciously. As visual arrangements of printed text on the graphic surface, graphic devices can contribute to the process of reading, combining with the semantic content within the context which that text creates. The book first sets out to demonstrate both how and why the graphic surface has been neglected. It looks at the perception of the graphic surface during reading and how it may be obscured by other concerns or automatised until unnoticed. Then, the book examines some critical assumptions about the transformation of manuscript to novel and what our familiarity with the printed form of the book leads us to take for granted. It looks at theoretical approaches to the graphic surface, particularly those which see printed text as either an idealised sign-system or a representation of spoken language. The book further looks at how 'blindness' to the graphic surface, and particularly its mimetic usage, is reflected and perpetuated in literary criticism. It deals with the work of specific authors, their texts and the relevant critical background, before providing a concluding summary which touches on some of the implications of these analyses.

A reassessment
Josephine A. Koster

rubricated abbreviation for ‘Amen’ and preceding his scribal colophon, further calling attention to the prayer collection as a distinct unit of content. The layout of the text of the prayers differs in several ways from the text of the Book . Salthows copies the fifteen individual prayers as if they were one contiguous document, without any of the rubrication or scribal flourishes used in the main text to indicate chapters, nomina sacra , and the like. 4 Usually when scribes inserted prayers or short

in Encountering The Book of Margery Kempe
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The first wife’s response
Caitlin Flynn

falling into outright obscenity. By first appearances, the first wife’s response seems to adopt this suggestive language and content as she envisions a new world order in which romantic relationships are ephemeral and women dictate their terms and conditions. But she unexpectedly shifts tone and register to indict her husband’s sexual shortcomings and even to conflate him with demons and Satan. This shift disintegrates her utopian vision of free love and feminine power to reveal the reality of her powerlessness

in The narrative grotesque in medieval Scottish poetry
Katherine J. Lewis

revisit the manner in which the Book was created. These are used to argue for Margery Kempe's decisive role in determining both the content and the form of the Book . Forging an encounter between Margery Kempe and the methodologies of oral history allows for fresh reflection on the status of the Book as a historical narrative. My approach thus aligns itself with existing scholarship which contends that the Book offers access to vital truths about the experiences of an individual medieval woman regardless of the precise accuracy of events described within it. By

in Encountering The Book of Margery Kempe
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The widow as venerean preacher
Caitlin Flynn

more typical parodic sermons. Mock-sermons are not uncommon in medieval plays and other comic poetry, and they generally tread a fine line between blasphemy and humour. The widow’s speech, like other examples, relies on a carnal and worldly narrative to undermine the conventional content of the sermon. Victor Scherb, in reference to the Digby ‘Mary Magdalene’, asserts that the play’s humour is effective only if the behaviour of the blasphemous characters is recognisable. 4 He goes on to observe, ‘the parody […] may be

in The narrative grotesque in medieval Scottish poetry
Jill Liddington

kerseys. 14 Despite requiring greater capital outlay, it offered greater profits both at home and abroad. The new generation of capitalists was no longer content with the old packhorse routes, complaining that the old Halifax-Wakefield road running above Shibden had ‘become so exceedingly deep and ruinous that…many parts thereof are unpassable for waggons, carts and other wheel carriages’. So in 1741 parliament introduced the Halifax and Wakefield Turnpike Trust, with 175 elected

in Female Fortune
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Frame, form, and narratorial persona
Caitlin Flynn

revise their engagement with the poem and startlingly undermines the private, passionate responses of the women. The discomfort elicited by the final demande is made possible by the structure and content of the preceding narrative(s): each speech manifests cracks in the audience’s expectations and perceptions until the narrator’s final ‘playful’ comment essentially implodes the narrative on itself. This process begins when the narrator describes the locus amoenus and the nobility of the women. These

in The narrative grotesque in medieval Scottish poetry
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What do we talk about when we talk about Dante’s reception?
Federica Coluzzi

readers like William Gladstone, Matthew Arnold and Christina Rossetti ( Chapters 1 – 3 ) the writerly activity over and within the margins of the page or the book channelled their critical engagement into a self-referential, and hence cryptic, commentary. Graphic signs, single words or more discursive comments reveal that readers’ processes of knowledge construction were often anchored to the content, form or linguistic translation of certain

in Dante beyond influence
Philip H. Wicksteed and Victorian mass readerships
Federica Coluzzi

) public and for the stimulation of the scholarly interest of committed students. Both would be equipped with a copy of the lecturer’s syllabus: a thirty-to-forty-page-long handbook in demi octavo detailing the outline and content of the course, recommended bibliography and a list of questions for home study. Used synchronously, the syllabus supported students in ‘following the lectures without distraction of taking notes’ ( Jepson

in Dante beyond influence