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C. E. Beneš

the Lombard League, the Genoese more or less successfully resisted efforts by Charlemagne's German heirs to re-establish imperial sovereignty in Italy. 37 The emperors often had to content themselves with official—but functionally meaningless—recognition of their suzerainty. A major complicating factor was the contemporary conflict between the empire and the papacy: at the same time that emperors such as Frederick I Barbarossa (r

in Jacopo Da Varagine’s Chronicle of the city of Genoa
E.A. Jones

life, because again his preaching brought him no praise, and he asked the Duke [ sc. John of Gaunt] for the hermitage in the woods, and lived there for a time, sometimes running into the town, and sometimes into the country. And when pious people in Leicester, believing in his sanctity, tried to send food to him, as was their wont, he would pretend to austerity, as though content with his lot in the world, and would refuse and return

in Hermits and anchorites in England, 1200–1550
E.A. Jones

Pentecost, you should fast, as the Rule requires. Moreover during Lent, on Wednesdays, Fridays and Saturdays, you should content yourself with pottage, bread, and ale or (if you wish) water. On other days in Lent, apart from Sundays, pottage and one other dish will be sufficient for your meal. You should always abstain from meat, unless illness or debility prevent you. 23 You should keep silence while you are eating, unless you

in Hermits and anchorites in England, 1200–1550
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E.A. Jones

she being troubled (as she said) with certain unruly children of hers, and able to get no peace from them, was content to go with the accused and be his wife. Being asked whether he knew her carnally, as men do their wives, he utterly denies the same, and says that that was neither of their intention. Being asked how he chanced to come to this town, he says that, now since the Queen’s reign, he was

in Hermits and anchorites in England, 1200–1550
E.A. Jones

educate the young, to be troubled about the upkeep of relatives or friends, nor to be occupied with unprofitable or vain conversations. But since you have food and something with which to cover yourselves if the occasion demands, be content with these, in accordance with the counsel of the Apostle [1 Tim. 6:8], so as to be totally free for those things which pertain to the salvation of your souls – and do not let anger impede

in Hermits and anchorites in England, 1200–1550
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Mayke de Jong and Justin Lake

foreheads’ ( Ecce dedi faciem tuam valentiorem faciebus eorum, et frontem tuam duriorem frontibus eorum ). 28 Again, the reference is to remarks Wala delivered at the Aachen assembly held over the winter of 828/9, but their content probably reflects the concerns of the 840s and 850s, especially in the kingdom of Charles the Bald. See De Jong, Epitaph , pp. 193–9. 29 Louis is accused of having interfered too much in the religious domain Radbert considers to be the prerogative of the clergy: the conduct of divine worship ( cultus divinus ) and the way of life of the

in Confronting crisis in the Carolingian empire
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Mayke de Jong and Justin Lake

and even in gait. And as an example to others of the humility that they displayed in their own conduct, I shall cite merely one case among many. While he practised greater austerity than anyone else by consuming only the humblest food, he also wanted to be content with the customs 284 of that country, saying that it was not fitting that a monk, who ought to be dressed in humble clothes according to the practice of the land in which he lived, should wear more elegant clothing or partake of more refined food than the men of that region who were his companions

in Confronting crisis in the Carolingian empire
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Gervase Rosser

, fitz-Stephen gives concrete information about the social composition of the city (note the presence of rural aristocrats and peasant vendors, and the clerical population), its cosmopolitan trade, and its intellectual and sporting culture. 8 The text is therefore of value both for its descriptive content and for the claims implied by its rhetorical composition. D. C. Douglas and G. W. Greenaway

in Towns in medieval England
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Gervase Rosser

purpose of this book to present a range of that late medieval evidence, and to draw attention both to the challenges which it presents to interpretation and to the potential rewards of its study. The documents introduced here have been chosen both for the interest of their particular content and in order to exemplify some of these issues of historical analysis. The extracts which are reproduced on the following

in Towns in medieval England
Abstract only
Gervase Rosser

rights or good practices, the document was typically conservative in content, and the historian should be careful not to overestimate its transformative effect. Many small medieval towns found means to organise local affairs and to create a sense of collective identity without ever enjoying the formal dignity of a charter. 11 However, those who did lobby for a charter of rights attached great

in Towns in medieval England