Search results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 407 items for :

  • Manchester Religious Studies x
  • Refine by access: All content x
Clear All
Michael Carter-Sinclair

Austria in general. The lack of reliable and clearly truthful sources of information did not help to calm matters. Much of what passed as news from official sources was clearly propaganda, and was equally clearly inaccurate at the least, sometimes ridiculous, including content that was completely unbelievable and at odds with visible evidence. From the early days of the war, much of the propaganda output was driven by the military, with no involvement from civilians, and therefore produced without regard for what might have helped morale on the home front. 23 Against

in Vienna’s ‘respectable’ antisemites
Abstract only
Eric Pudney

’, and was evidently written by a highly educated person – almost certainly a clergyman, in view of its content and the attitude of its author. It is, therefore, effectively a new primary source on learned witchcraft belief, which dates to the period when Elizabethan witchcraft persecution was at its most intense. It is also a highly unusual one. Unlike virtually all other sources of information on this subject, it is very explicit in discussing the theological underpinnings of witchcraft belief, and outlining precisely why such belief is, in the author’s view

in A defence of witchcraft belief
Michael Carter-Sinclair

agreement contained a ‘secret protocol’ that confirmed Austria as a ‘German state’ which, through its diplomatic efforts, would support German foreign policy where it could. 102 A further agreement, a November protocol, extended the 1935 agreement on the ‘Aryan’ content of Austrian films, now requiring sufficient ‘German’ content in further cultural areas, such as theatre and music. 103 While the clauses supporting German diplomatic efforts were new, the provisions regarding internal, anti-Jewish moves simply formalised what was already happening in Austria. The

in Vienna’s ‘respectable’ antisemites
Elliot Vernon

it was an unacceptable schism. Godly conformity was also maintained by a culture of self-imposed censorship whereby conforming ministers actively avoided reading or circulating works discussing different visions of ecclesiastical polity. The Worcestershire minister Richard Baxter found that prior to 1640 the works of nonconformist authors such as Paul Baynes or Robert Parker on church polity were unavailable to him. Baxter had to content himself with material written by godly conformists such as John Burges or John

in London presbyterians and the British revolutions, 1638–64
Elliot Vernon

criticism was of a legal-constitutional nature, as Convocation claimed to be entitled to make canons without parliamentary consent, and to grant a £20,000 subsidy to the king. 37 Alongside legal-constitutional criticism, the godly’s protests were aimed specifically at the content of the canons. 38 This included criticism of the first canon (that monarchy and the monarch’s right to taxation were divinely ordained), the seventh canon (which set a position for the communion table vis-à-vis the altar and genuflexions

in London presbyterians and the British revolutions, 1638–64
Elliot Vernon

content to establish elderships on Parliament’s pattern and returned a series of queries about the parliamentary ordinance of September 1645. The common council directed that the committee, a majority of which were religious presbyterians, should review the ministers’ grievances. Juxon detected foul play in the selection of this committee and it seems likely that Sion College had instigated its creation so that the clergy could use the committee as a vehicle within the city government for their own campaign. 81 This was the

in London presbyterians and the British revolutions, 1638–64
Elliot Vernon

), p. 980; [Anon.], Master Edmund Calamies leading case (1663), p. 14. 87 P. Lake and M. Questier, ‘Agency, appropriation and rhetoric under the gallows: puritans, romanists and the state in early modern England’, P&P , 153:1 (1996), 104–5. 88 P. Lake, ‘Popular form, puritan content? Two puritan appropriations of the murder pamphlet from mid-seventeenth century London’ in Religion, culture and society in early modern Britain: essays in honour of Patrick

in London presbyterians and the British revolutions, 1638–64
Abstract only

griffin in S1, the dragon is a theriomorphic combination. The dragon is worse, however, as with its beastly body, its leathery wings, and its fire breathing it combines three of the four elements: earth, air, and fire (and as it is closely associated with its watery cousin the leviathan, it can be seen to cross all four). As the medieval mind thought that God had decreed that every creature should be associated with only one of the four elements, and to be content therein, the dragon, with its transgression to exist in

in Manchester Cathedral
Michael Carter-Sinclair

the new church, and Schindl made the point that he was writing with the full backing of the district council. Schindl continued that the ‘home-loving German population’ had welcomed Czechs into their midst but were now besieged, witnesses to creeping Czech influence. He wrote that the Czechs were no longer satisfied with just having their own church in Vienna, a reference to the church of Maria am Gestade, in the Innere Stadt , which was closely associated with the Czechs of the city. Nor were they content just to use that church to raise their children in ‘Czech

in Vienna’s ‘respectable’ antisemites

and attended a religious society which read a sermon of Archbishop Tillotson in 1713. 38 As to sermon content, the apparent pro-Sacheverell sermon was noted earlier. More standard fare can be seen in the preaching of Dr Robert Harper (chaplain 1709–15) on the duty of frequent communion, the sacrament being seen as a ‘badge’ of the Saviour’s followers. This resolved Harrold’s ‘scruples’. Dr John Copley (fellow 1706–32) preached on the duty to live as if the end was at hand, restraining ‘unruly passions

in Manchester Cathedral