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Theatre, form, meme and reciprocity
John Drakakis

story is not dissimilar in terms of content from the preoccupations of Aeschylus’s Oresteia or Seneca’s rewriting of parts of it. Moreover, the shapes that these narratives took resemble isolated events that are laid out in more detail in texts such as Holinshed’s Chronicles , or the recycling in translation of Livy’s History of Rome . As we saw earlier, Peter Lake’s lengthy account in his book How Shakespeare Put Politics on the Stage (2016) seeks to map the transition from a political narrative fashioned by the

in Shakespeare’s resources
John Drakakis

word ‘traffic’ simply as ‘business’ and cites the OED as support. 7 In the interests of incorporating Shakespeare fully into the commercial world with which we are familiar, scholars have been content to assume that words such as ‘traffic’ and ‘business’ (alongside ‘competition’) adequately depict what are assumed to be the energies, competitive and otherwise, that generated plays. For us the word ‘traffic’ has taken on far darker meanings, often associated with the illegal movement and sale of people. That

in Shakespeare’s resources
John Drakakis

and the other a source, require very little in the way of speculation. However, in the cases of the two untranslated Italian narratives, we are required to believe either that Shakespeare could read Italian, or that he knew of these novellae second-hand. It is also, of course, possible that the content of these stories circulated in London during the early 1590s, thereby demoting them from the status of ‘probable source’ subject to documentary verification, to ‘analogue’. Stories about the behaviour of Jews and usurers

in Shakespeare’s resources
Abstract only
The elephant in the graveyard
John Drakakis

, this does not tell us very much. Miola rightly calls out the impressionism that informs much source study but he still hangs on to the concept, and he does not probe the possible connections or the tensions between a new technology such as printing and the more conservative (and hierarchical) pressures of a residual oral culture. At the limited level of content, at least some, possibly much, of what we identify as potentially ‘literary’ source material may already have had a life in the oral culture of early modern England

in Shakespeare’s resources
Abstract only
John Drakakis

note refers to a whole range of contemporary writers of prose, poetry and chronicles. However, Kiséry is not content simply to accept the view that the printing of Hamlet with its typographical indication of sententiae heightened its ‘(presumably low) cultural prestige’ by associating the book of the play with ‘scholarly reading’ that involved the consumption of its contents. 14 Indeed, he seeks to excavate a dynamic, interactive context for the play, and to identify the wisdom of the play as

in Shakespeare’s resources
John Drakakis

, the Princess nominates a formula for comedy: That sport best pleases that doth least know how – Where zeal strives to content and the contents Dies in the zeal of that which it presents; Their form confounded makes most form in mirth, When great things labouring perish in their birth. (5.2.514–18) But the ending of Love’s Labour’s Lost goes much further with the admission of Marcadé, an ambassador of death whose news of the

in Shakespeare’s resources
Abstract only
Shakespeare, Jonson and the circulation of theatrical ideas
John Drakakis

storyline and genre’ 31 is the culmination of a process of comparing the relation between one text and another. Kristeva, however, regards this pleasure as subversive in that it is derived from the challenge and the exposure to critique that these comparisons present to culturally and politically over-determined meanings. But even more, the relation addresses the very process of subjectification that traditional criticism is content to collapse into the banal question of ‘authorship’. Added to this, we cannot simply substitute

in Shakespeare’s resources
Abstract only
John Drakakis

“secondary”’. 99 But what in Jones is a rather more cautious approach to the contents and organisation of Shakespeare’s mind that we can only reassemble retrospectively and speculatively, in Burrow turns into a rather more confident assessment of Shakespeare’s reading intentions: Shakespeare read classical and contemporary works not just to plunder content (similes, exempla , phrases that could be out into plays) or narrative ideas (plots, sub-plots, scenes gestures). He also read to learn a

in Shakespeare’s resources
John Drakakis

itself on the one hand, and the synchronic interactions of the text with other contemporary texts – whether in terms of content or form – are to be distinguished clearly from each other as ways of approaching a text, any text. Indeed, what Barker and Hulme launch in their essay, Hawkes had already begun to develop into what in Meaning by Shakespeare became a sustained manifesto for a critical procedure that proffered a challenge, often with extraordinary wit and perception, ‘the supposed “authenticity” of the text as a

in Shakespeare’s resources
Derricke, paratext, and poetic reception
Denna J. Iammarino

conventions in unconventional ways. 8 Derricke is seemingly no different as he praises his dedicatee, Sir Philip Sidney, his protagonist, Sir Henry Sidney, his readers in Ireland, and his ‘good and gentle’ and ‘well disposed reader[s]’ in England, supposedly. 9 Yet, the paratextual structure of Derricke’s poem is far from predictable; arguably its abundance of letters to the reader and dedications suggests that Derricke is concerned with keeping the predictable readings of his content at the forefront of his reader’s mind

in John Derricke’s The Image of Irelande: with a Discoverie of Woodkarne