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Philippa Maddern

produced by the central government (excluding legal documents). 55 To members of the upper classes of county communities, minute status distinctions articulated within a system of honour-recognition could be vital for both men and women, determining whose word and reputation were held to be sound, who should hold administrative power, who would control the execution of law, and whose patronage should be sought by whom. To

in Gentry culture in late-medieval England
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Deborah Youngs

link that cut across rank and gender distinctions: for example, unlike networks identified through administrative records and county communities, this literary network allowed women an active role. What is also notable is that the Fastolf network was based in a particular household, in East Anglia, a region which has been described as ‘distinctive and self-sufficient, impatient, even suspicious’ of

in Gentry culture in late-medieval England
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Peter Fleming

. 12 Virgoe, ‘Aspects of the county community’, pp. 8–11; Payling, ‘Widening franchise’; McFarlane, ‘Parliament and “bastard feudalism” ’, in his England in the Fifteenth Century , pp. 1–21; Paston Letters , ed. Davis, I, pp. 577–80 (no. 354), and II, pp. 47–9 (no. 460) and p. 54 (no. 464

in Gentry culture in late-medieval England
Anthony Musson

–4. 54 J. R. Maddicott, ‘The county community and the making of public opinion in fourteenth-century England’, TRHS , 5th series, 18 (1978), p. 32; Doig, ‘Royal proclamations’, pp. 259–60. 55 Gransden, Historical Writing , p. 28

in Medieval law in context
Anthony Musson

), pp. 324–5, 384. 13 J. R. Maddicott, ‘The county community and the making of public opinion in fourteenth-century England’, TRHS , 5th series, 18 (1978), pp. 27–43. 14 Dodd, ‘Crown, magnates and gentry’, pp. 181

in Medieval law in context
Anthony Musson

(eds), The English Rising of 1381 (Cambridge, Cambridge University Press, 1981), pp. 182–3. 51 For instance, eyres proclaimed in Kent and Durham in 1333: Crook, ‘Later eyres’, p. 265; F. Bryant, ‘The financial dealings of Edward III with the county communities’, EHR , 83 (1968), pp. 763

in Medieval law in context
Phillipp R. Schofield

pervasive conception of the medieval community. While Carpenter posits, only circumspectly, that the term might have some potential referential worth for the medieval village (which, though noting evidence to the contrary, she identifies as capable of being perceived as ‘isolated’ and with ‘clearly defined borders, both geographical and social’), she suggests that the concept of community as applied to the county community or the village community has been overly influenced by structural-functionalist anthropology and the kinds of investigation that saw in modern

in Peasants and historians
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Remapping early modern literature
Matthew C. Augustine

doubt it was in part the intellectual atmosphere created by postmodernism that allowed Revisionism to assert itself as peremptorily as it did, in fact it was the most parochial and conventional sort of English historical research that provided the initial spark. Originally seeking to extend the theoretical Whig-Marxist view of early Stuart England to granular scale, a clutch of historians in the 1950s and 1960s began closely to examine the phenomenon of civil war allegiance in English county communities. Again and again, however, the expected linkages between

in Aesthetics of contingency