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Simon Walker

The ‘county community’ in later medieval England enjoyed a brief but influential vogue during the 1980s, lasting roughly from Nigel Saul’s Knights and Esquires (published in 1981), a study of the Gloucestershire gentry in the fourteenth century, to Simon Payling’s Political Society in Lancastrian England (published in 1991), a study (despite its title) of the Nottinghamshire gentry in the first half of the fifteenth. This vogue was partly the consequence of a kind of intellectual overspill from the early modern period, then suffering from a glut of such

in Political culture in later medieval England
Paul Brand

‘franchises’ on behalf of the county to match and complement the individual claims of franchises which all franchise-holders were now being required to submit to the king’s justices as a preliminary to the testing of franchise claims in the quo warranto proceedings, specifically to safeguard their distinctive customs against any possible claims that they had been forfeited for non-claim. 40 The subsidiary purpose was to seek a remedy from the justices for what the county community alleged to be two abuses of recent origin in relation to the presentment of Englishry and the

in Law, laity and solidarities
Abstract only
G. L. Harriss

conscious identity did it have? These were difficult questions to answer and, in an article in 1994, Carpenter pressed them against those who adhered to the notion of a county community. What evidence was there for such? Neither the meetings of the county court nor the quarter sessions showed the county acting as a corporate entity. The elite gentry families may have led and identified with the county, but their interests generally ranged far wider. In any case a true county community should embrace the numerous lesser families, whose solidarities were with their

in Political culture in later medieval England
Simon Walker

Banaster’s revolt in 1315 and the subsequent suppression of the Contrariants lasted well into Edward II’s reign. Continued violence rendered necessary a rapid expansion of the peace commission until, by 1350, it was over sixty strong. 19 Neither this, nor the attempts of the county community at collective peace keeping did much good, for the coercive powers of the palatinate’s law officers consistently proved too weak for their task. 20 Cattle rustling, inevitably frequent in an upland county, remained rife and often led to serious affrays. 21 There were attacks and

in Political culture in later medieval England
Abstract only
Philippa Maddern

produced by the central government (excluding legal documents). 55 To members of the upper classes of county communities, minute status distinctions articulated within a system of honour-recognition could be vital for both men and women, determining whose word and reputation were held to be sound, who should hold administrative power, who would control the execution of law, and whose patronage should be sought by whom. To

in Gentry culture in late-medieval England
Abstract only
Deborah Youngs

link that cut across rank and gender distinctions: for example, unlike networks identified through administrative records and county communities, this literary network allowed women an active role. What is also notable is that the Fastolf network was based in a particular household, in East Anglia, a region which has been described as ‘distinctive and self-sufficient, impatient, even suspicious’ of

in Gentry culture in late-medieval England
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Peter Fleming

. 12 Virgoe, ‘Aspects of the county community’, pp. 8–11; Payling, ‘Widening franchise’; McFarlane, ‘Parliament and “bastard feudalism” ’, in his England in the Fifteenth Century , pp. 1–21; Paston Letters , ed. Davis, I, pp. 577–80 (no. 354), and II, pp. 47–9 (no. 460) and p. 54 (no. 464

in Gentry culture in late-medieval England
Anthony Musson

–4. 54 J. R. Maddicott, ‘The county community and the making of public opinion in fourteenth-century England’, TRHS , 5th series, 18 (1978), p. 32; Doig, ‘Royal proclamations’, pp. 259–60. 55 Gransden, Historical Writing , p. 28

in Medieval law in context
Anthony Musson

), pp. 324–5, 384. 13 J. R. Maddicott, ‘The county community and the making of public opinion in fourteenth-century England’, TRHS , 5th series, 18 (1978), pp. 27–43. 14 Dodd, ‘Crown, magnates and gentry’, pp. 181

in Medieval law in context
Simon Walker

’ as both the Commons and his own Council urged him to employ, while avoiding the charge of excessive interference in the affairs of the county community preferred against Richard II. The relationship between William Gascoigne and the new king soon developed beyond the purely official; he became one of Henry’s most trusted advisers, summoned to his presence in July 1401 ‘pur chivacher en nostre compaignie pur certaines treschargeantes matires touchante lestat de nous et de nostre roiaume’ and singled out by the Council in 1405 as one of those in whom the king put

in Political culture in later medieval England