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Orian Brook, Dave O’Brien, and Mark Taylor

that it is not just in terms of careers, but even things like tastes are changed by parenting. Parenting has wide-ranging impacts. Our more substantive point from Tasha’s comment is the powerful impact parents have on their children’s connection to culture. This point is grounded in extensive academic literature demonstrating the important role parents play in supporting cultural engagement. 1 In Tasha’s case the pursuit of her own cultural interests is inhibited by the responsibilities of parenthood. Instead her personal cultural participation becomes expressed

in Culture is bad for you
Orian Brook, Dave O’Brien, and Mark Taylor

is a clear relationship between people’s cultural consumption and more general social inequalities. We can show this with England as our example. In England, on average, someone in a high-status job, with a degree, in the higher managerial or professional category, who is female, and living in the South of England, has particularly high engagement in culture. Those in working-class occupations, ethnic minorities, and those without wealth, have significantly less formal cultural engagement as compared to their wealthy, White counterparts. From our analysis we

in Culture is bad for you
Orian Brook, Dave O’Brien, and Mark Taylor

is a way to address some of the unequal patterns of cultural engagement. We discuss these in Chapter 4 . The social view of health allows the report to take in a wide range of health effects. It looks across the life course from birth to old age and death, and at place and community level effects. It has a broad view of culture, citing the theorists Raymond Williams 30 and Pierre Bourdieu 31 to establish an anthropological take on culture grounded in cultural engagement and experience. It is similar to Understanding the Value of Arts & Culture . Overall

in Culture is bad for you
Abstract only
Orian Brook, Dave O’Brien, and Mark Taylor

totally unrepresentative of the patterns of cultural engagement in the working-class population. The remaining chapters explain these inequalities by analysing key points in the life course of a cultural worker. They also continue the themes we’ve introduced earlier in the book. Chapter 5 discusses the role of culture in our cultural workers’ childhoods. It shows the role of individualisation of inequalities, along with the problem of seemingly shared experiences. Many of the patterns of inequalities we’ve seen in production and consumption begin in childhood

in Culture is bad for you