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Kate McLuskie and Kate Rumbold

controversial topic of the historical provenance of the precious items from overseas that now constitute the global collections in British museums. Among the arts researchers, curators and educators in that gathering, controversies about high and low culture, pushpin or poetry, the ancients and the moderns, were forgotten or unmentionable in the demonstration of an open-minded celebration of cultural engagement

in Cultural value in twenty-first-century England
Kate McLuskie and Kate Rumbold

engagement has shifted from broadcasting and delivering culture to all, to encouraging more active engagement, yet some troubling issues persist. When the The Madonna of the Pinks went on national tour, it was surrounded by a host of cultural engagement activities, including working with young people from less privileged areas. As we showed in Chapter 4 , invoking a direct experience of work of art

in Cultural value in twenty-first-century England
Abstract only
Kate McLuskie and Kate Rumbold

benefit of Shakespeare workshops as opposed to other forms of prison rec-reation; questions about the most effective ways of overcoming the ‘poverty of aspiration’ cannot be independently addressed because, when they enter the narrative, they spoil the story and break the spell. Discussion of the enabling conditions of cultural engagement undermines the agency of the central characters on which the

in Cultural value in twenty-first-century England
Kate McLuskie and Kate Rumbold

-fulfilling’ activity. These alignments between ‘Shakespeare’, the social relations that structured cultural engagement and the contested relations within the twentieth-century cultural market have all but disappeared in the twenty-first century’s philanthropically supported reproduction of ‘Shakespeare’. However, they continue to exercise some leverage in the contest between academic

in Cultural value in twenty-first-century England
The scholarly achievements of Sir James Ware
Mark Empey

the printing world, it is quite clear that Dubliners looked to Ware to satisfy their intellectual interests. It is not simply the enthusiasm for books and manuscripts that is so fascinating, but the range of the material which individuals sought to borrow. For example, John King was loaned the History of Elizabeth (1625) by William Camden. Edward Parry received John Owen’s Epigrammata (1606–13) while Ware’s brother, Joseph, asked for a Latin play composed by George Wither, pointing to a demand for literature. There is also evidence of lively cultural engagement

in Dublin