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Pascale Drouet

humanist thought’), 22 and ‘New Historicism’ and ‘Cultural Materialism’. The latter has close connections with ‘New Historicism’ in ‘its intellectual origins, and its explicit concern with power and its cultural representations’, but has, according to Hebron, ‘a more explicit and self-conscious political engagement, mixing French theoretical language with British polemical traditions of non-conformity and class-struggle’. 23 ‘New

in Shakespeare and the denial of territory
John Drakakis

to linear patterns on the one hand, or to the domesticated post-structuralist practice of ‘allowing a free interplay among texts, including the texts of historical reality (sometimes distinguished as “contexts”)’ 72 on the other. Hillman invokes Jean Howard’s odd conflation of New Historicism and Cultural Materialism as critical tendencies that seek ‘virtually to strip literary works of textuality by positing “a hierarchical relationship in which literature figures as a parasitical reflector of historical fact”’. 73 This

in Shakespeare’s resources
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John Drakakis

. 138. 79 Ibid. , p. 178. 80 Mullaney, The Reformation of Emotions , p. 41. 81 See Alan Sinfield, Faultlines: Cultural Materialism and the Politics of Dissident Reading (Los Angeles and Oxford, 1992), pp. 46ff. ‘When a part of our worldview threatens disruption by manifestly failing to cohere with the rest, then we reorganise and retell its story, trying to get it into shape – back into the old shape if we are conservative

in Shakespeare’s resources
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John Drakakis

thereby anticipating the critical practice of demythologisation that was shortly to become a central tenet of British cultural materialism. Jones’s objective was twofold: to establish a pre-history in the early sixteenth century that might challenge the claimed unhelpfulness of literary historians; and to counter ‘the desire to impose manageable period-divisions [that] has put more stress on superficial discontinuity’ – an emergent radical critical manoeuvre – ‘than continuity at a deeper level’. 78 Following on from T

in Shakespeare’s resources
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Shakespeare, Jonson and the circulation of theatrical ideas
John Drakakis

About Nothing , ed. Claire McEachern, Arden 3 series (London, 2006). 36 Kristeva, Revolution in Poetic Language , p. 57. 37 Alan Sinfield, Faultlines: Cultural Materialism and the Politics of Dissident Reading (Los Angeles and Oxford, 1929), p. 47. 38 Ibid. , p. 49. 39 Kristeva, Revolution in Poetic Language , pp. 57–8. 40 For a fuller discussion of the

in Shakespeare’s resources
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Richard James Wood

Minnesota Press, 1978) and Alan Sinfield, ‘Protestantism: Questions of Subjectivity and Control’ in Faultlines: Cultural Materialism and the Politics of Dissident Reading (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1992). 27 These beliefs may be referred to as either ‘Melanchthonian’ or ‘Philippist’. 28 Stillman, ‘Deadly Stinging Adders’, pp. 247–8. Famously, Sidney was sent as an ambassador to the imperial court to communicate Elizabeth’s condolences to Maximilian’s son and heir, Rudolf II (see H. R. Woudhuysen, ‘Sidney, Sir Philip (1554–1586)’, in Oxford Dictionary of

in Sidney's Arcadia and the conflicts of virtue
John J. Joughin

, aimless, disconnected and alienated – but also suffused with libido and creative of some of the most remarkable insights, poetry and dramatic moments of these great plays’. 24 While cultural materialism and new historicism have offered us the reductive functionalism of an ‘automaton-like’ subject determined by an Althusserian or Foucauldian matrix of ideology and power, Grady

in Shakespeare’s histories and counter-histories
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Daniel Cadman
,
Andrew Duxfield
, and
Lisa Hopkins

stage. There are a number of sub-genres of tragedy – biblical tragedy and closet drama, for example – in which Shakespeare did not engage and there were also many sub-genres in which the nature of his influence was interrogated. The chapters in this collection also respond to the growth in interest in non-Shakespearean plays driven by the development of such critical and theoretical currents as new historicism, cultural materialism and feminism, as well as the recent re-emergence of repertory studies. A consequence of this has been that the range of Renaissance plays

in The genres of Renaissance tragedy
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Annaliese Connolly
and
Lisa Hopkins

practices adopted by proponents of New Historicism and cultural materialism Leeds Barroll used the example of Shakespeare’s Richard II and its relationship with Elizabeth and Essex to point out some of the potential blind spots in the arguments which emphasised the seditious nature of the theatre and its dramatists. He argued that the desire to link Shakespeare to Essex via Richard II came from ‘a narrative promoted by a nineteenth

in Essex
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Regime change in Macbeth
Richard Wilson

Subversion: Henry IV and Henry V’ , in Jonathan Dollimore and Alan Sinfield (eds), Political Shakespeare: New Essays in Cultural Materialism (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 1985), p. 33. 5 James I, The Kings Maiesties Speech to Parliament, 1609 (London: Robert Barker, 1609

in Free Will