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Caroline Sturdy Colls and Kevin Simon Colls

When Alderney’s pre-war population returned in December 1945, evidence of occupation still dominated the landscape and clean-up operations continued for years afterwards. In the decades since, the islanders, local government and British government have grappled with this legacy and the issue of forced and slave labour. This chapter focuses on the legacies of the occupation and the impact that this has had on how the sites and stories connected to forced and slave labour have been approached since WW2 at local, national and international level. Beginning with a review of the impact that the ravaged landscape had on Alderney’s returning islanders and vice versa, the chapter charts the ways in which cultural memory and approaches to archaeology and heritage have evolved up to the present day.

in 'Adolf Island'
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imagination of the latter away from an Auschwitz-centric model and act as ‘a measure of restoration of what has been lost and erased’, both on Alderney and in terms of wider narratives. 6 We have also aimed to demonstrate how archaeological methods, interdisciplinary approaches and considerations of material culture can facilitate a greater understanding of events, individual and collective experiences, and the formation of cultural memory; thus, we hope to encourage similar investigations at other sites of

in 'Adolf Island'
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Caroline Sturdy Colls and Kevin Simon Colls

camps fit into the wider Nazi camp system across Europe? What was known about the events of the occupation in its aftermath and why were the perpetrators not brought to justice? How have these reactions influenced the landscape and cultural memory? Therefore, the book stands apart from previous works in that it offers a novel interdisciplinary view that is necessarily a record of the experiences and identities of those who suffered and died on Alderney, a historical retelling of the events of the occupation, a

in 'Adolf Island'
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Ian Wedde

and in its mission statements that the work of ‘designing the future’ goes well beyond conserving cultural memory for consumption by future audiences. The project’s multidisciplinary goals are expressed in activist terms; memory is given explicit agency in a future imagined as potentially dystopian. Current global crises and transformations (from climate change to mass migration) highlight the need to develop more sustainable and resilient future making practices, and encourage different areas of interest to pursue common goals and learn from one another.4 ‘The

in Curatopia
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Katherine Fennelly

redevelopment of lunatic asylum sites and the popular understanding of these buildings which has impacted their reuse. The popular cultural memory of lunatic asylums as places of incarceration, abuse, and control is articulated in literature and film. Popular representations of lunatic asylums as coercive and inhumane contribute to the marginalisation of these buildings on a local level. In turn, this marginalisation has led to the destruction or rebranding of redeveloped institutions, effectively removing any association with mental illness from the communities that once

in An archaeology of lunacy
The politics of co-collecting
Sean Mallon

acquisitions in recent years for how it helps tell a story of Pacific Islanders in Aotearoa New Zealand, of migration, transnational ties, cultural memory and loss, and the politics of co-collecting. It is an item that would not have come into the Pacific Cultures collections if Kupa Kupa did not have some sense of ownership, responsibility or an opinion about what was important, and what should be collected to represent Pacific peoples in the national museum. As in most museums, curators are responsible for developing Pacific Cultures collections at Te Papa. I am one of

in Curatopia