Search results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 91 items for :

  • "cultural memory" x
  • Manchester Literature Studies x
  • Refine by access: All content x
Clear All
Joshua Davies

115 3 Medievalist double consciousness and the production of difference: Medieval bards, cultural memory and nationalist fantasy Thomas Gray’s 1757 poem ‘The Bard’ sits at the centre of a complex network of medievalist cultural memory. Gray was an accomplished scholar and historian as well as poet, familiar with many works of medieval as well as Classical literature, and his poem was first published at his good friend Horace Walpole’s press at Strawberry Hill. An image of Walpole’s astonishing medievalist building is printed on its title page (see Figure  3

in Visions and ruins
Joshua Davies

18 1 Ruins and wonders: The poetics of cultural memory in and of early medieval England In the beginning there is ruin. Jacques Derrida, Memoirs of the Blind: The Self-​Portrait and Other Ruins1 When is the now of a medieval text? How might a text be situated in, or free from, historical process? These are the questions posed by Benjamin Thorpe in the preface to his edition of Cædmon’s Metrical Paraphrase of Parts of the Holy Scriptures, in Anglo-​ Saxon, a foundational work of Anglo-​Saxon studies first published in 1832. Although he justified his edition by

in Visions and ruins
Abstract only
Cultural memory and the untimely Middle Ages
Author: Joshua Davies

This book is a study of cultural memory in and of the British Middle Ages. It works with material drawn from across the medieval period – in Old English, Middle English and Latin, as well as material and visual culture – and explores modern translations, reworkings and appropriations of these texts to examine how images of the past have been created, adapted and shared. It interrogates how cultural memory formed, and was formed by, social identities in the Middle Ages and how ideas about the past intersected with ideas about the present and future. It also examines how the presence of the Middle Ages has been felt, understood and perpetuated in modernity and the cultural possibilities and transformations this has generated. The Middle Ages encountered in this book is a site of cultural potential, a means of imagining the future as well as imaging the past.

The scope of this book is defined by the duration of cultural forms rather than traditional habits of historical periodization and it seeks to reveal connections across time, place and media to explore the temporal complexities of cultural production and subject formation. It reveals a transtemporal and transnational archive of the modern Middle Ages.

Abstract only
Orphanhood, kinship, and cultural memory in contemporary American novels

Making Home explores the orphan child as a trope in contemporary US fiction, arguing that in times of perceived national crisis concerns about American identity, family, and literary history are articulated around this literary figure. The book focuses on orphan figures in a broad, multi-ethnic range of contemporary fiction by Barbara Kingsolver, Linda Hogan, Leslie Marmon Silko, Marilynne Robinson, Michael Cunningham, Jonathan Safran Foer, John Irving, Kaye Gibbons, Octavia Butler, Jewelle Gomez, and Toni Morrison. It also investigates genres as carriers of cultural memory, looking particularly at the captivity narrative, historical fiction, speculative fiction, the sentimental novel, and the bildungsroman. From a decisively literary perspective, Making Home engages socio-political concerns such as mixed-race families, child welfare, multiculturalism, and racial and national identity, as well as shifting definitions of familial, national, and literary home. By analyzing how contemporary novels both incorporate and resist gendered and raced literary conventions, how they elaborate on symbolic and factual meanings of orphanhood, and how they explore kinship beyond the nuclear and/or adoptive family, this book offers something distinctly new in American literary studies. It is a crucial study for students and scholars interested in the links between literature and identity, questions of inclusion and exclusion in national ideology, and definitions of family and childhood.

Abstract only
Euro-American orphans, gender, genre, and cultural memory
Maria Holmgren Troy, Elizabeth Kella, and Helena Wahlström

3 Literary kinships: Euro-American orphans, gender, genre, and cultural memory The writers I most consciously respond to are the nineteenth-century American writers like Melville, Dickinson, Poe, and Twain. (Robinson, 1992: 157) Though literary orphanhood has carried different meanings in different historical periods, it has often worked as a prism, refracting and reflecting ideas about national identity and belonging. The canonization of orphan tales and the popularity of genres featuring literal or metaphorical orphans, particularly in the nineteenth century

in Making home
Abstract only
Migrations
Joshua Davies

9 19 Afterword: Migrations The past is always contemporary. Derek Jarman1 This book has traced a series of movements across time, space, form and media. It has attempted to reveal and accommodate the diversity of the archive of the Middle Ages and demonstrate how forms of cultural memory produced in or inspired by the Middle Ages define subject positions, collective identities and visions of the future. It has offered a series of micro-​histories that illustrate the intimate connections between ideas of ‘the modern’ and ‘the medieval’ and outline some of the

in Visions and ruins
Texts, intertexts, and contexts
Maria Holmgren Troy, Elizabeth Kella, and Helena Wahlström

literary and social history and elaborating especially on literature as cultural memory. We trace the central position of orphans in nineteenth-century American literary history as it has been constructed in the twentieth century; orphans have played major roles in a dominant white male tradition in criticism, but also in gendered and ethnic challenges to that tradition. Previous critical discussion of orphans typically focuses on children’s literature, or on nineteenth-century literature, but nevertheless offers useful insights into the historically shifting roles and

in Making home
Abstract only
Hood’s tied trope
Sara Lodge

immediately and incontinently to everything around them and everything within them  .  .  .  There is an overwhelming tendency, in such states, to word-play and puns.13 Incontinent punning, like swearing, can also be a feature of Tourette’s syndrome and of manic states. Punning is thus, crucially, associated with social disinhibition. It carries both positive cultural memories of infant play, the pleasures of orality prior to communicative responsibility, and negative adult connotations of unstable, potentially anti-social verbal excess. The fact that, in extreme form

in Thomas Hood and nineteenth-century poetry
Dead men writing
Sharon Lubkemann Allen

In the fictions of Fedor Mikhailovich Dostoevsky and Joaquim Maria Machado de Assis frequently follow eccentrics who approach others with nervous smiles and satirical smirks. Dostoevsky's and Machado de Assis's fictions are populated by eccentric characters who, like Akaky Akakievich Bashmachkin, often mumble and gesture to themselves on the street. Dostoevsky's and Machado de Assis's eccentrics provoke that jostling in the street. Comparatively reconsidering dialogues in Dostoevsky's and Machado de Assis's narratives, this chapter argues against claims concerning dissembling and dehumanizing, disassembled and dead-ended underground narrative. Malcolm Jones notes in his study of Dostoevsky's Novel of Discord that the city and consciousness comprise a 'dynamic idea' that is continually being 'displaced'. Dostoevsky's and Machado de Assis's underground texts become central subtexts in Russian and Brazilian cultural memory, underpinning or serving as point of departure for continually displaced dissent.

in EccentriCities
Christopher Lloyd

activated in her characters and mediated by the family home to probe relations between memory, race, and nation. I argue that the centrality of domesticated feeling in this novel is politicised, not least in the relation between national memory, community memory, and the specific memories of the Boughton family. While readers might call the Gilead trilogy historical fiction, this essay also sees Home as a work of cultural memory; a remediation of the mid-twentieth century in the American Midwest. 1 Memories at once held

in Marilynne Robinson