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John Drakakis

, libraries, whether digitised or not, are the documentary repositories of a more or less specialist cultural memory, but in the early modern period printed texts were clearly not sui generis , although they offered, by comparison with the digitised archive, relatively restricted access. Indeed, living memory in its various forms competed with print technology as an alternative mode of cognition, and what was documented might easily have had another (initially oral) identity, circulating originally and/or contemporaneously by word

in Shakespeare’s resources
John Drakakis

shouldst have done it, and neither have told it me’ recalls a much fuller political gloss and a series of consequences that Menas’s aside fully grasps as he parts company with Pompey. The North sentence triggers a political antecedent whose political contours a largely non-literate audience might themselves have recalled and recognised. Here it would seem that omission owes little to the insights of cognitive literary theory but more to professional and collective cultural memory and the proximity in the public

in Shakespeare’s resources
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Accession, union, nationhood
Christopher Ivic

, staged its intra- and inter-island warfare and formed its multinational writing communities. Centred chronologically by the years 1603–25, this book explores Britain and its writing subjects within the context of the unprecedented triple monarchy of the Scottish King James VI and I, whose accession to the English throne in 1603 and desire for Anglo-Scottish or British union prompted his subjects to reflect on questions of cultural memory, intermingling, nationhood, national sovereignty, neighbourliness and political subjectivity/citizenship in new and exciting ways

in The subject of Britain, 1603–25
Janice Valls- Russell

threats against a besieged city and of focused maternal grieving further strengthens the Trojan analogy by establishing a kinship not only between Angiers and Troy but also between the fates of Constance and Arthur and those of Andromache and Astyanax, through a tradition that extends from Homer to Euripides to Seneca and Virgil. 20 The Troy story was part of the cultural memory, the city’s fall

in Interweaving myths in Shakespeare and his contemporaries
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Tamsin Badcoe

unworkable in spaces shaped by the imagination, cultural memory, and the conscience, or where, as Harry Berger, Jr. has observed, ‘psyche is scarcely separable from nature, inscape from landscape’. 10 Instead, Spenser’s knights, questing in pursuit of holiness, temperance, chastity, friendship, justice, and courtesy, seem to be guided by the exercise of their hidden virtue as if it were a compass needle pointing homewards. The complete path remains occluded, its endpoint as problematic to fix as true north. I describe The Faerie Queene in these

in Edmund Spenser and the romance of space
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A series of first female presidents from Commander in Chief to House of Cards
Elisabeth Bronfen

of the body politic he represents. What the statue of Claire Hale in the credit sequence of the final chapter of House of Cards demonstrates is, however, that, in the case of a female president, the relation between the two is less straightforward. It is Claire’s pregnant body that stands both for the continuity of her rule and for her place in cultural memory – as a sovereign and as a mother. Indeed, comparable to the ambivalent gendering of the queen’s body, the female president’s also has a masculine and a feminine component. In contrast to her masculine

in Serial Shakespeare
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Appropriation, dislocation, and crossmapping
Elisabeth Bronfen

preserved. From the onset, furthermore, the function of aesthetic formalisation was to restrain the intensity expressed by an artwork, so as to make its force affordable to future artistic articulations. Or put another way, in that aesthetic forms capture a passion and translate this intensity into an image, so that it can be apprehended as an image, they hold the passion contained in the image at bay. Conceived as a crystallisation of emotions, aesthetic forms, according to Warburg, survive as an inheritance transmitted by cultural memory. As such, they can

in Serial Shakespeare
John Derricke versus Edmund Spenser
Brian C. Lockey

, 1558–1689: Studies in Community-Making and Cultural Memory (Burlington, VT: Ashgate, 2009), pp. 47–72. 34 Derricke, The Image of Irelande , p. 8. 35 Canny, Making Ireland British , p. 124. Another leader of the Desmond rebellion, James FitzMaurice FitzGerald, made a well-known public gestures of faith by making a pilgrimage to the Holy Cross of Tipperary at the start of the rebellion. Fernando Garrido and C.B. Cayley, Persecutions from the

in John Derricke’s The Image of Irelande: with a Discoverie of Woodkarne
Instead of a conclusion
Ruth Morse

Ovids, as might an actor preparing to bring him to another kind of life; but some cultural memory of condemnation lingered, or Lucio’s author could not have used it. Lucio sullies what he touches, like a cheap Iago. In context, Lucio runs apparently unrelated classical names together; and this is not the only example of a reference beyond the reach of other characters on stage. To show this technique at work, a

in Interweaving myths in Shakespeare and his contemporaries
Reinventing history in 2 Henry IV
Alison Thorne

cultural memory which binds us imaginatively to the past. By the same token, the only way that Hal can set his kingdom on a progressive course towards a brave new future of national self-assertiveness is by cutting it loose from the past and, more particularly, from the repetitive rhythms of individual and collective remembrance. Having tried to bury the people’s memories of the

in Shakespeare’s histories and counter-histories