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Olivia Umurerwa Rutazibwa

. ( 1993 ), ‘ Eurocentrism and Modernity (Introduction to the Frankfurt Lectures) ’, Boundary 2 , 20 : 3 , 65 – 76 . Dussel , E. ( 2008 ), Twenty Theses on Politics ( Durham, NC : Duke University Press ). Grosfoguel , R. and Cervantes-Rodriguez , A. M. ( 2002 ), ‘ Introduction: Unthinking Twentieth-century Eurocentric Mythologies: Universal Knowledge, Decolonization, and Developmentalism ’, in Grosfoguel , R. and Cervantes-Rodriguez , A. M. (eds

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
The Aid Industry and the ‘Me Too’ Movement
Charlotte Lydia Riley

Development, 1940s–1960s ’, in Smith , A. W. M. and Jeppesen , C. (eds), Britain, France and the Decolonization of Africa: Future Imperfect ? ( London : UCL Press ) pp. 43 – 61 . Riley , C. L. ( 2019 ), ‘ Labour’s International Development Policy

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Marie-Luce Desgrandchamps, Lasse Heerten, Arua Oko Omaka, Kevin O'Sullivan, and Bertrand Taithe

Macmillan ). Kalter , C. ( 2016 ), The Discovery of the Third World: Decolonization and the Rise of the New Left in France, c.1950–1976 ( Cambridge : Cambridge University Press ). Knoch , H. ( 2001 ), Die Tat als Bild: Fotografien des Holocaust in

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
The role(s) of the military in Southeast Asia
Alex J. Bellamy and Bryn Hughes

of threats: threats emanating from China and the necessity of ‘balancing’ Chinese hegemony; threats relating to territorial disputes produced by decolonization; and secessionist and Islamist threats. Between them these portrayals of threat constitute a powerful case for insisting on the centrality of military force to the provision of security from threats emanating from

in Critical Security in the Asia-Pacific
Systems and structures in an age of upheaval
Torbjørn L. Knutsen

was replaced by the young, charismatic John F. Kennedy. His presidency symbolized the advent of a new generation with new political ideals. The USA was deeply shaken when Kennedy was assassinated in Texas in October 1963 and replaced by the Texan Senator Lyndon B. Johnson (1963–69). In the USSR, the Soviet Premier Nikita Khrushchev was toppled in a palace coup in 1964 and replaced by Leonid Brezhnev. One of the most significant issues that marked international relations during these years was that of decolonization. Nations in Asia and Africa demanded self

in A history of International Relations theory (third edition)
Sara E. Davies

‘events occurring before 1 January 1951’ to ‘events occurring in Europe before 1 January 1951’. Evidently, the concerns addressed by the 1951 Convention were specific to European experiences and neglected African and Asian experiences and perceptions. This neglect was a product of two factors. First, because decolonization was still underway in 1951 there were very few Asian or

in Critical Security in the Asia-Pacific
The Cold War after Stalin
Torbjørn L. Knutsen

notes some of the changes that occurred within each of the blocs – within the Communist bloc frictions were visible on the 1955 Bandung Conference; within the West frictions broke out as a result of the 1956 Suez Crisis. The chapter also notes how the two superpowers busily build atomic weapons and accumulate huge nuclear arsenals. Finally, the chapter notes how the overseas empires of European powers begin to unravel. These two processes – the nuclear arms race and decolonization – affected the superpower rivalry so deeply that they became defining elements

in A history of International Relations theory (third edition)
Abstract only
The end of International Relations?
Torbjørn L. Knutsen

half of the twentieth century, wars of liberation faded and became a phenomenon of the past. Chailand made a similar argument about wars of revolution: such wars were in effect a creation of modern, revolutionary states like China and the USSR. These wars were a distinct phenomenon during the course of the Cold War – especially during the phase of decolonization when the Soviets sponsored radical movements to take power in Third World countries. However, after the collapse of communism in the USSR and China, revolutionary wars largely disappeared. This has left only

in A history of International Relations theory (third edition)
Abstract only
Why a history of International Relations theory?
Torbjørn L. Knutsen

nuclear deterrence. During the 1960s, when politicians and activists were concerned with decolonization and with the fate of the increasing number of newly independent states, they constructed theories to explain the poverty of these new states and to assess their chances of economic and political development. Another assumption of the book is that scholars who address the concerns of their times tend to formulate their arguments in concepts and terms they have inherited from the past – whether they know it or not. John Maynard Keynes famously noted that

in A history of International Relations theory (third edition)
Geopolitics and capitalist development in the Asia-Pacific
Mark Beeson

security have been redefined to give greater emphasis to the survival of the state as the core concern of security practice ( Alagappa, 1998 ), an outcome that is understandable given the significantly lesser degree of state capacity that exists in Northeast as opposed to Southeast Asia. In Southeast Asia the challenges of nation-building in the aftermath of decolonization, the difficulties of encouraging

in Critical Security in the Asia-Pacific