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Olivia Umurerwa Rutazibwa

. ( 1993 ), ‘ Eurocentrism and Modernity (Introduction to the Frankfurt Lectures) ’, Boundary 2 , 20 : 3 , 65 – 76 . Dussel , E. ( 2008 ), Twenty Theses on Politics ( Durham, NC : Duke University Press ). Grosfoguel , R. and Cervantes-Rodriguez , A. M. ( 2002 ), ‘ Introduction: Unthinking Twentieth-century Eurocentric Mythologies: Universal Knowledge, Decolonization, and Developmentalism ’, in Grosfoguel , R. and Cervantes-Rodriguez , A. M. (eds

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
The Aid Industry and the ‘Me Too’ Movement
Charlotte Lydia Riley

Development, 1940s–1960s ’, in Smith , A. W. M. and Jeppesen , C. (eds), Britain, France and the Decolonization of Africa: Future Imperfect ? ( London : UCL Press ) pp. 43 – 61 . Riley , C. L. ( 2019 ), ‘ Labour’s International Development Policy

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Marie-Luce Desgrandchamps, Lasse Heerten, Arua Oko Omaka, Kevin O'Sullivan, and Bertrand Taithe

Macmillan ). Kalter , C. ( 2016 ), The Discovery of the Third World: Decolonization and the Rise of the New Left in France, c.1950–1976 ( Cambridge : Cambridge University Press ). Knoch , H. ( 2001 ), Die Tat als Bild: Fotografien des Holocaust in

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Abstract only
Claire Sutherland

’s (1970) concern that ‘conceptual travelling’ should not ‘stretch’ terms outwith their appropriate context, and guides the detailed discussion of the Vietnamese case throughout this book. Not long before his death, the eminent anthropologist Clifford Geertz called on academics across the social sciences to rethink the process and consequences of ‘nationalism, decolonization, democratization, economic takeoff, modernization

in Soldered states
Chen Kertcher

. II:  The Age of Decolonization, 1955–1965 (London and Basingstoke: Macmillan Press, 1989), pp. 3–14; S. Schlesinger, Act of Creation: The Founding of the United Nations: A Story of Superpowers, Secret Agents, Wartime Allies and Enemies, and Their Quest for a Peaceful World (Boulder, CO: Westview Press, 2003), pp. 19–31. 26 For comprehensive studies on the Security Council see: Bailey and Daws, The Procedure; Malone (ed.), The UN Security Council; Lowe et al. (eds), The United Nations Security Council. 27 A/RES/1991A (XVIII), 17 December, 1963. 28 For elaboration

in The United Nations and peacekeeping, 1988–95
Matthias Maass

-determination had hardened enough, the political environment was ripe for decolonization and large-scale small state creation. This highly accommodating environment remains in place today, and as a result new small states emerged during the post-Cold War and post-9/11 periods. 140 Small states in world politics Systems of collective security in twentieth-century world politics: from Wilsonianism to a “New World Order”2 and beyond Wilsonian Internationalism and the interwar years, 1919–39 As the First World War raged on, the US president Woodrow Wilson readied himself to

in Small states in world politics
Abstract only
Alanna O’Malley

, destiny and the fate of Third Worldism’, Third World Quarterly, 25:1 (2004), 9–​39; S. Jensen, The Making of International Human Rights: The 1960s, Decolonization and the Reconstruction of Global Values (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2016); W.R. Louis and R. Robinson, ‘The imperialism of decolonization’, Journal of Imperial and Commonwealth History, 22:3 (1994), 462–​511; W.R. Louis, ‘Public enemy number one: Britain and the United Nations in the aftermath of Suez’, in Martin Lynn (ed.), The British Empire in the 1950s: Retreat or Revival? (New York: Palgrave

in The diplomacy of decolonisation
Alanna O’Malley

companies. It has already been shown that preservation of the traditional position of private companies in the Congolese economy and in other former colonies was at the heart of British approaches, but for the US, expanding the role of American business in these newly opened markets also proved an important consideration of Cold War policy. As Thomas has described it, ‘in the business of decolonization, as in its politics, the trend towards Americanization was irresistible’.96 The links between both Eisenhower and Kennedy’s administrations and private business interests

in The diplomacy of decolonisation
Abstract only
Alanna O’Malley

colonial policy defined the British approach towards the Special Political and Decolonization Committee (the Fourth Committee) and later the Special Committee on Decolonisation (Committee of 24), established in 1961. The optics of this approach 56 56 The diplomacy of decolonisation were carefully managed. Foreign Office officials cautioned that the representation of British policy on colonial matters should not be perceived as obscuring UN policy on the issue, despite the fact that the central aim was in fact to limit the effects of UN policy as far as possible to

in The diplomacy of decolonisation
Past, present, and future
Matthias Maass

states were ‘born’ into a states system that hinged on a bipolar balance of power, but also featured a growing network of institutions and regimes that assisted small states, and energized further efforts at decolonization and small state creation. The robust bipolarity of the Cold War severely limited small states from triggering balancing maneuvers in the way previous eras had allowed. Nevertheless, small states were repeatedly able to use the highly competitive and ideologically charged bipolarity of the Cold War The story of small state survival 231 to their

in Small states in world politics