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Angela Carter‘s Exposure of Flesh-Inscribed Stereotypes
Mariaconcetta Costantini

The human body is a crucial site for the inscription of cultural paradigms: how people are perceived controls the way they are treated. Postmodernist writers have shown sexual roles, racial inequalities and other forms of discrimination to be parts of a process of reductio ad absurdum, consisting of the identification of the individual‘s social functions with their anatomical features as well as with the habitual marking of their bodies. This article examines Angela Carter‘s The Infernal Desire Machines of Doctor Hoffman where Carter‘s refusal of established body politics is most clearly dramatised. This novel exposes the dreary consequences of power/weakness relations, together with its contradictory exploitation of Gothic devices, making it an esssential testimony to Carter‘s postmodernist reconfiguration of worldviews and narrative modes.

Gothic Studies
Kirsten Forkert
,
Federico Oliveri
,
Gargi Bhattacharyya
, and
Janna Graham

/Women’s Cultural Forum, Nottingham Contemporary, July 2017. 196 Refusing the demand for sad stories of migrantification are often translated non-verbally through gestures and micropolitical events, and the possible resistances to these moments. For example, a scene developed by co-researchers from Birmingham Asylum and Refugee Association (see Scene III in the script at conflictmemorydisplacement.com) also vividly portrayed the gestural dimension of discrimination. The scene depicts a group of students in a further education college studying to become care workers. They are

in How media and conflicts make migrants
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Waiting for freedom and equality in Nwandu and Beckett
Graley Herren

he liked and respected the persons involved’ ( 1996 : 608). The truth is that those artists liked and respected enough to be permitted creative liberties in adapting Beckett's work have almost always been white men while those denied equal artistic autonomy – not always, but far too frequently – have been women and/or people of colour. Notice the conspicuous patterns of discrimination in productions singled out for rejection, denunciation or legal injunction: A proposed (and denied) 1973 production of

in Beckett’s afterlives
How displaced people are made into ‘migrants’
Kirsten Forkert
,
Federico Oliveri
,
Gargi Bhattacharyya
, and
Janna Graham

and, through this, their status and identity. More generally, categorisation was identified as a technique of day-to-day hierarchisation and discrimination, with state bureaucracies bleeding violently into everyday life: First, there’s tourism, second, their dogs, third, Polish people, fourth, homeless people and then we come. Yes, there’s a sequence of the British diagram. Okay? We are last. We are last to come. (Birmingham, 10 March 2017) The practice of categorisation was regarded as an aspect of wider dehumanisation, part of a seemingly never-ending process of

in How media and conflicts make migrants

The book explores how we understand global conflicts as they relate to the ‘European refugee crisis’, and draws on a range of empirical fieldwork carried out in the UK and Italy. It examines how global conflict has been constructed in both countries through media representations – in a climate of changing media habits, widespread mistrust, and fake news. In so doing, it examines the role played by historical amnesia about legacies of imperialism – and how this leads to a disavowal of responsibility for the reasons people flee their countries. The book explores how this understanding in turn shapes institutional and popular responses in receiving countries, ranging from hostility – such as the framing of refugees by politicians, as 'economic migrants' who are abusing the asylum system – to solidarity initiatives. Based on interviews and workshops with refugees in both countries, the book develops the concept of ‘migrantification’ – in which people are made into migrants by the state, the media and members of society. In challenging the conventional expectation for immigrants to tell stories about their migration journey, the book explores experiences of discrimination as well as acts of resistance. It argues that listening to those on the sharpest end of the immigration system can provide much-needed perspective on global conflicts and inequalities, which challenges common Eurocentric misconceptions. Interludes, interspersed between chapters, explore these issues in other ways through songs, jokes and images.

Black Feet in the Snow (BBC, 1974)
Sally Shaw

Power movement, its visceral depiction of racial discrimination and its critique of Britain’s colonial past. However, the stage play’s radicalism also extended to its form—an innovative mix of Caribbean orature and Brechtian elements. Two years after its first stage performance, Black Feet in the Snow was filmed for BBC2’s Open Door community strand in 1974. The television adaptation was unusual

in Screen plays
Youth, pop and the rise of Madchester
Author:

Madchester may have been born at the Haçienda in the summer of 1988, but the city had been in creative ferment for almost a decade prior to the rise of Acid House. The End-of-the-Century Party is the definitive account of a generational shift in popular music and youth culture, what it meant and what it led to. First published right after the Second Summer of Love, it tells the story of the transition from New Pop to the Political Pop of the mid-1980s and its deviant offspring, Post-Political Pop. Resisting contemporary proclamations about the end of youth culture and the rise of a new, right-leaning conformism, the book draws on interviews with DJs, record company bosses, musicians, producers and fans to outline a clear transition in pop thinking, a move from an obsession with style, packaging and synthetic sounds to content, socially conscious lyrics and a new authenticity.

This edition is framed by a prologue by Tara Brabazon, which asks how we can reclaim the spirit, energy and authenticity of Madchester for a post-youth, post-pop generation. It is illustrated with iconic photographs by Kevin Cummins.

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Author:

This is the first book-length study of one of the most significant of all British television writers, Jimmy McGovern. The book provides comprehensive coverage of all his work for television including early writing on Brookside, major documentary dramas such as Hillsborough and Sunday and more recent series such as The Street and Accused.

Whilst the book is firmly focused on McGovern’s own work, the range of his output over the period in which he has been working also provides something of an overview of the radical changes in television drama commissioning that have taken place during this time. Without compromising his deeply-held convictions McGovern has managed to adapt to an ever changing environment, often using his position as a sought-after writer to defy industry trends.

The book also challenges the notion of McGovern as an uncomplicated social realist in stylistic terms. Looking particularly at his later work, a case is made for McGovern employing a greater range of narrative approaches, albeit subtly and within boundaries that allow him to continue to write for large popular audiences.

Finally it is worth pointing to the book’s examination of McGovern’s role in recent years as a mentor to new voices, frequently acting as a creative producer on series that he part-writes and part brings through different less-experienced names.

Heather Norris Nicholson

Chapter 8 focuses on amateur films that addressed current social issues. Drawing on varied examples discussion explores the periodic trenchant criticisms of amateurs’ neglect of socially relevant topic concerns found within the specialist press and highlights aspects of filmmaking that overtly respond to contemporary issues. While much amateur footage discloses details of time and place, attention focuses here first on films about public health, welfare and housing before and after the start of the National Health Service, as well as the effects of post war urban redevelopment. Shot in hospitals, training centres and in the midst of urban slum clearance, such material varies stylistically from early actuality, topicals and documentaries to the visual reportage of Standard and Super 8mm users, and also the experimentation of post-war cinema, and reflects the changing involvement and interests of younger filmmakers. Issues of morality, violence, pornography, substance abuse and discrimination feature among later amateur productions as do issues of conflict and international insecurity, poverty, and growing up. Choice of topic and its handling denote shifting attitudes too, as seen in films concerning disability and homelessness. While socially engaged film-making represents a relatively small proportion of overall amateur activity, it is too important to ignore.

in Amateur film
Kim Akass

childless counterparts. While our child-free sisters are very slowly crawling towards fairer pay policies, mothers continue to fight the battle of unequal economic discrimination, based on their perceived inability to juggle career and childcare: ‘Mothers suffer a penalty relative to non-mothers and men in the form of lower perceived competence and commitment, higher professional

in Mothers on American television