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T.K. Ralebitso-Senior, T.J.U. Thompson, and H.E. Carney

In the mid-1990s, the crime scene toolkit was revolutionised by the introduction of DNA-based analyses such as the polymerase chain reaction, low copy number DNA analysis, short-tandem repeat typing, pulse-field gel electrophoresis and variable number tandem repeat. Since then, methodological advances in other disciplines, especially molecular microbial ecology, can now be adapted for cutting-edge applications in forensic contexts. Despite several studies and discussions, there is, however, currently very little evidence of these techniques adoption at the contemporary crime scene. Consequently, this article discusses some of the popular omics and their current and potential exploitations in the forensic ecogenomics of body decomposition in a crime scene. Thus, together with published supportive findings and discourse, knowledge gaps are identified. These then justify the need for more comprehensive, directed, concerted and global research towards state-of-the-art microecophysiology method application and/or adaptation for subsequent successful exploitations in this additional context of microbial forensics.

Human Remains and Violence: An Interdisciplinary Journal
The shifting boundaries of politics in Norwegian healthcare
Anette Fagertun

Introduction This chapter explores how labour and labour relations in the Norwegian municipal healthcare sector are enacted and shaped within a specific socio-historical institutional ecology, and it argues that shifting boundaries of politics have contributed to a debasing of (care) work and to the emergence of precarious (contingent) labour situations in care. The chapter aims to analyse imaginaries arising from depoliticisation, and effects on labour realities in the public healthcare services, by mobilising theoretical

in Intimacy and mobility in an era of hardening borders
Struggles against open-pit mines on the border
Rozita Dimova

environmental cost from the investment,” claimed Alexis Tsipras. His position on the gold mine in Halkidiki seemed clear. No open-pit mine should operate on Halkidiki. Syriza always rallied against the gold mining projects and it was with this stance that Tsipras's party won the elections in Halkidiki. Giorgos Velegrakis specialized in the Halkidiki conflict for his doctorate in Geography and Political Ecology at the Department of Geography of Harkopia University. Until June 2015 he also worked for Syriza on preparing an alternative development strategy

in Border porosities
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Porous trails at the border
Rozita Dimova

, especially in anthropology, I have felt that the available approaches have constrained my own approach to what borders mean and what they actually do. They allow us to focus on both micro and macro history, to politics and economy, and, indeed, on ecology and architecture away from the actual borders. I tried to explain why I have been fascinated by the concept of porosity and by the way that natural scientists approach it. The most compelling facet of “porosity” is, in a way, its detachment – not political but, rather, methodological and theoretical. Much in line with

in Border porosities
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Ethnography for a data-saturated world
Hannah Knox and Dawn Nafus

social systems offer an early example of how information-theoretical Introduction 5 thinking was incorporated into anthropology and used to reshape a distinctive approach to the discipline (Bateson 1972; Mead 1968). Ecological anthropologist Roy Rappaport’s groundbreaking study of the relationship between ritual and ecology offered a similarly systems-theoretical method of socio-natural analysis to chart the relationship between the abundance or scarcity of ecological resources and ritual process, an approach which has more recently been taken up in computer

in Ethnography for a data-saturated world
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In search of global health
Didier Fassin

. Glover , S. ( 2009 ) ‘ Review of “Mark Nichter: Global Health: Why Cultural Perceptions, Social Representations, and Biopolitics Matter” ’, Human Ecology , 37 ( 5 ), 669–670 . Gluckman , M. ( 1961 ) ‘ Ethnographic Data in British Social Anthropology ’, The Sociological Review 5–17 , 91. Janes , C. and K

in Global health and the new world order
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Migrant prehistory
Paul Carter

. Scaled up to the ensemble of flight paths in any day, an avian movement form was a palimpsest of infant arabesques, a dense blot formed of all the criss-crossing deviations between field and hedge, rooftop and puddle, one weather and the next. Framing even the steepest descent line (falcon or gannet) was a ceiling of loops, long, thoughtful circuits, abrupt incurvings and speculative inclines. Inside the appearance of empirical aptitude ancestral habits persisted, not simply reflecting physiology or ecology but memory: I remember that the rooks continued their ragged

in Translations, an autoethnography
Open Access (free)
Lorenzo Ferrarini and Nicola Scaldaferri

call an ecological approach, we are interested in the relational and experiential aspects of sound that cut across dichotomies between nature and culture, non-musical sound and music. The term ‘ecological’ as we use it here does not refer to Schafer’s concept of acoustic ecology and its concern for noise pollution and lo-fi soundscapes, but rather to the capacity of sound to enact relationships between species, places and meanings (Feld 1996 ). In order to represent the acoustic environments that we encountered in their most complex form, we expanded our focus in

in Sonic ethnography
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Modelling, ethnography and the challenge of the anthropocene
Hannah Knox

. https://blogs.sas.com/content/hiddeninsights/2014/03/17/ guest-blog-why-shifting-baseline-impacts-big-data-analysis/ [last accessed 21 February 2018]. Oreskes, Naomi, Shrader-Frechette, Kristin and Belitz, Kenneth. 1994. ‘Verification, Validation, and Confirmation of Numerical Models in the Earth’. Science 263(5147): 641–6. Pauly, Daniel. 1995. ‘Anecdotes and the Shifting Baseline Syndrome of Fisheries’. Trends in Ecology and Evolution 10(10): 430. 150 Knowing data Savage, M. and Burrows, R.. 2007. ‘The Coming Crisis of Empirical Sociology’. Sociology 41(5): 885

in Ethnography for a data-saturated world
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Topologies of coexistence
Paul Carter

they do not represent anything but themselves, in Kantor's formulation, they signify only the passage of the sound, its coming and going. As a result, the atmosphere we breathe is fatally thinned. What we might call the ecology of affect is poisoned. Misunderstood to the end, migrants should make common cause with them. The link Ó Laoire makes – ‘humans will inevitably decline by means of their own toxic discourses in parallel with the bird's waning fortunes’  61 – is also expressed in Light where William Light

in Translations, an autoethnography