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Political, cultural, green
Andrew Patrizio

‘wary of holism, but needy for connection’ Donna Haraway, A Cyborg Manifesto , 1985) If Elizabeth Grosz is right in asserting that ‘art is not the antithesis of politics, but politics continued by other means’, 1 then it surely follows that art history must also be something of an oblique political strategy. The previous chapter has given us a firm orientation on ecology within the anarchist movement, exploring its potential to reimagine the discipline of art history. One of the fundamental positions of the ecological eye, however, is to

in The ecological eye
Andrew Patrizio

, in my view, to the social ecology of Murray Bookchin, who we look at in Part II . For Plumwood, the ‘disavowal of nature is accomplished through the hegemonic construction of autonomy and agency. A centric or colonising system typically differentiates very strongly between a privileged, hegemonic group awarded full agency status who are placed at the centre and excluded peripheral groups who are denied agency and whose contribution is discounted, neglected, denied, or rendered invisible.’ 10 She implies a posthuman approach as a way to develop a democratic and

in The ecological eye
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Assembling an ecocritical art history
Author: Andrew Patrizio

The ecological eye aims to align the discipline of art history with ecology, climate change, the Anthropocene and the range of politics and theoretical positions that will help to ground such an approach. It looks both backwards and forwards in order to promote the capacities of close attention, vital materialism, nonhierarchy, care and political ecology. The book seeks to place the history of art alongside its ecocritical colleagues in other humanities disciplines. Three main directions are discussed: the diverse histories of art history itself, for evidence of exemplary work already available; the politics of social ecology, Marxist ecologies and anarchy, showing its largely untapped relevance for work in art history and visual culture; and finally, emerging work in posthumanism and new materialism, that challenges unhelpful hierarchies across the human, animal, botanical and geological spheres. The ecological eye concludes with an appeal to the discipline to respond positively to the environmental justice movement.

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Socially engaged art and theory

The avant garde is dead, or so the story goes for many leftists and capitalists alike. But so is postmodernism an outmoded paradigm in these times of neoliberal austerity, neocolonial militarism and ecological crisis. Rejecting ‘end of ideology’ post-politics, Vanguardia delves into the changing praxis of socially engaged art and theory in the age of the Capitalocene. Reflecting on the major events of the last decade, from anti-globalisation protest, Occupy Wall Street, the Maple Spring, Strike Debt and the Anthropocene, to the Black Lives Matter and MeToo campaigns, Vanguardia puts forward a radical leftist commitment to the revolutionary consciousness of avant-garde art and politics.

Andrew Patrizio

many inverted commas, so many differing levels of ecological abuse.) Murray Bookchin, social ecology and culture By now, ecocritical thinking and anarchy are well bound together. Whilst this is intellectually unsurprising, especially given the polymathic interests of its earliest founders, in particular Kropotkin, it is certainly true that the manifestations over the late nineteenth century until the justice movements of the 1960s meant that anarchy’s more violent, divisive and urban contours were more generally visible. However, for Wilson and Kinna

in The ecological eye
Andrew Patrizio

Three Ecologies might help in setting out ‘an expanded definition of subjectivity: the emergence of subjective factors at the heart of the major political and social transformations of the 1980s, the increasing development of machinic forms of subjectivation, and finally the growing amplification of relevant ethico-aesthetic perspectives throughout the 1980s’. These three fields, as we have seen, are ‘mental (“nascent subjectivity”), social (“a constantly mutating socius”) and environmental ecology (“an environment in the process of being reinvented”)’. 21

in The ecological eye
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Travelling images
Anna Dahlgren

materialization or their medium, to use Belting’s terminology. The following chapters seek to investigate the social biography of a selected number of images and pictures, but also on a more profound level the social biography of the notion of art. In a somewhat similar way Sunil Manghani has used the notion ‘image ecology’, originally coined by Susan Sontag. The concept of ecology refers to the interrelationship of livings organisms and their environment. Thus the term ecology serves as ‘a metaphor for a desire to understand the interrelationships of things (the nature of

in Travelling images
Andrew Patrizio

exports due to the rhizomes they put out to grow, as they thrive on instability. 73 Crosby’s foundational historical account of dominant Europeans and their associated organisms (‘portmanteau biota’ 74 as he calls both) can be carried forward to more contemporary critical discussions of the detrimental role that industrialised farming plays today. Ecologies both deep and dark have looked in this direction. A deep ecological approach is put elegantly by Wendell Berry in books such as The Unsettling of America: Culture and Agriculture (1977) and Home Economics (1987

in The ecological eye
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Looking across the borderlands of art, media and visual culture
Author: Anna Dahlgren

Travelling images critically examines the migrations and transformations of images as they travel between different image communities. It consists of four case studies covering the period 1870–2010 and includes photocollages, window displays, fashion imagery and contemporary art projects. Through these four close-ups it seeks to reveal the mechanisms, nature and character of these migration processes, and the agents behind them, as well as the sites where they have taken place. The overall aim of this book is thus to understand the mechanisms of interfacing events in the borderlands of the art world. Two key arguments are developed in the book, reflected by its title Travelling images. First, the notion of travel and focus on movements and transformations signal an emphasis on the similarities between cultural artefacts and living beings. The book considers ‘the social biography’ and ‘ecology’ of images, but also, on a more profound level, the biography and ecology of the notion of art. In doing so, it merges perspectives from art history and image studies with media studies. Consequently, it combines a focus on the individual case, typical for art history and material culture studies with a focus on processes and systems, on continuities and ruptures, and alternate histories inspired by media archaeology and cultural historical media studies. Second, the central concept of image is in this book used to designate both visual conventions, patterns or contents and tangible visual images. Thus it simultaneously consider of content and materiality.

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Bound together
Andy Campbell

affiliation. In short, leather, for the purposes of this book, is proposed as a diverse sexual ecology that privileges fucking and improvisatory play, genital and non-genital pleasure, rules and their effacement—all under the rubric of a seemingly static visual iconography, which in actuality is always in the process of being amended, shored, repurposed, and obliterated. It is a live system of relationality, varied in its address. Powerful symbology—in the material form of leather and the visual forms of representation developed by artists, magazine editors, filmmakers, and

in Bound together