Search results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 12 items for :

  • Manchester Security, Conflict & Peace x
  • Refine by access: All content x
Clear All
Philip D. Morgan

: Curaç ao in the Early Modern Atlantic World (Athens: University of Georgia Press, 2012). 7 E.g. J. R. McNeill, Mosquito Empires: Ecology and War in the Greater Caribbean, 1620–1914 (New York: Cambridge University Press, 2010); D. Wheat, Atlantic Africa and the Spanish Caribbean, 1570–1640 (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2016); E. Bassi, An Aqueous Territory: Sailor Geographies and New Granada’s Transimperial Greater Caribbean World (Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 2016). 8 B. Ward, M. Bone

in The TransAtlantic reconsidered
Charlotte Heath-Kelly

be located within the late twentieth century – as other scholars contend through analyses of systems ecology, economic neoliberalism and the post-Cold War hegemony of liberal biopolitics (Evans and Reid 2014 ; Walker and Cooper 2011 ). While critical resilience scholars tend to assume a sudden emergence of resilience from the 1970s onwards, given the timing of Holling’s seminal treatment

in Death and security
Abstract only
Boyka Stefanova

settings and behavioural logics into ‘a complex ecology’ (Olsen 2007 : 45). Since its formative stage, it has been intended to have political consequences and logically has developed in a political direction (Forsyth 1967; Scheingold 1970 ), although domestic mobilisation around it remains low (Parsons 2007 ). Its principal embodiment, the European Union, has emerged as an

in The Europeanisation of conflict resolution
Abstract only
The conditioned human
Elke Schwarz

technological ecology within which biopolitical subjectivities are shaped is crucial here. The human in a technology-driven biopolitical age is not only determined by rationality but first and foremost captured in scientific terms and rendered analysable, predictable and knowable. In his writings and lectures, Foucault engaged predominantly with technology as dispositifs , as institutions and mechanisms of power, and was interested to a much lesser degree in the

in Death machines
Abstract only
Elke Schwarz

. The newly constituted biological-technological ecology within which we find ourselves today produces new modes of governance in all sociopolitical dimensions, including warfare. In this form, new military technologies represent and reinforce ‘the mutual interdependence of material, biocultural and symbolic forces in the making of social and political practices’ (Braidotti 2011 : 329). Code – biological, technological or juridical – serves as the semantic and semiotic

in Death machines
Abstract only
The evolution of a subject
Nicholas Canny

In this context I have found very persuasive S. D. Behrendt, ‘Ecology, Seasonality, and the Transatlantic Slave Trade’, in Bailyn and Denault, Soundings in Atlantic History , pp. 44–85. 29 The concept of re-peopling was developed by Bailyn himself in B. Bailyn, The Peopling of British North America: An Introduction (New York: Knopf, 1986). 30 B. Bailyn, The Barbarous Years: The Peopling of British North America: The Conflict of Civilizations, 1600–1675 (New York: Knopf, 2012

in The TransAtlantic reconsidered
Abstract only
Ethics beyond technics
Elke Schwarz

nothing less than the production of ‘who we are, how we view the world, how we interact with each other’; in short, at stake is nothing other than the shaping of human subjectivity and the ethical and political conceptions that emerge therefrom (Hardt and Negri 2006 : 66). The biopolitical rationale and the technologically mediated ecology in which humans today find themselves produces a subjectivity that stands under the imperative to eliminate risk, mitigate

in Death machines
Elke Schwarz

socio-political condition we find ourselves in today then warrants closer inspection, in particular in the context of warfare, as technology conditions not only subjectivities but also ethico-political interaction. It is, as Peter Sloterdijk suggests, an anthropo-technical ecology with a particular pervasive twist whereby ‘technology puts humanity at risk but will also save humanity by creating superior human beings’ (Sloterdijk 2009 : 27

in Death machines
Abstract only
Susanne Lachenicht, Charlotte A. Lerg, and Michael Kimmage

recent years, studies on the early-modern Atlantic World have become global and multi-faceted, giving rise to comparative and entangled histories. Atlantic History tackles themes that are prevalent in twenty-first-century history at large: ecology, port towns and cities, multinational and religious societies, networks, scientific revolutions, families and the individual. The second part of the volume assesses the challenges faced by scholars of transatlantic relations and focuses on the late nineteenth century and twentieth century. The

in The TransAtlantic reconsidered
Elke Schwarz

human as such (Canovan 1995 : 70). It is in fact with this uniqueness that each individual holds that new beginnings in turn are created in Arendt's account. However, it is also precisely here that any essentialising moment ends for Arendt, as the uniqueness of each individual is further shaped and determined through a material ecology and through the various contingencies that interactions with others carry within them. The human, as such, remains in flux

in Death machines