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The Church of England, migration and the British world
Joseph Hardwick

or national identities in new settler communities. One familiar argument is that Anglicanism lost its traditional associations with Englishness as it became a global faith. 41 Carey’s starting point is different, as her interest is in how the Church worked, as she put it, to ‘preserve older ethnic religious allegiances’ among expatriate communities. 42 For Carey, the Church of

in An Anglican British World
Emily J. Manktelow

decades’ worth of negotiation and debate about the terms of missionary families’ existence in the field. Flying in the face of permanent establishment and incorporated labour, missionary parents refused to consign their children’s spiritual, moral and physical condition to the temporal realities of their vocational choice. while the Christian Missionary feels constrained by the love of Christ to go forth and dwell among the heathen, expatriating himself from his native land, it does not necessarily

in Missionary families
Joseph Hardwick

information on colonial geography and demography helped develop a sense of global community among British expatriates and also played a formative role in shaping metropolitan attitudes towards race and Britishness. We know that evangelical mission organisations were important disseminators of information on empire. 11 But while the historiography on the spread of information on missions to ‘the heathen’ is

in An Anglican British World
Abstract only
Emily J. Manktelow

chauvinistic and judgemental aspects of the missionary personality, informed by an ever-present anxiety about their racial, cultural and spiritual status. Because of these difficulties in racially, culturally and socially positioning missionary children, they have been defined, along with other children of expatriate communities, as ‘third-culture kids’, a term originally coined by John and Ruth Hill Useem in the 1950s, and subsequently developed in sociological and educational circles, joined by the term ‘global nomads,’ more

in Missionary families