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The critique of British expansionism
Vicky Randall

Contemporary Review published the first of two articles on the subject. Both were written by Edward Jenkins, a Canadian expatriate, former member of the Colonial Society, and future Liberal MP for Dundee (1874–80). The first article, titled ‘Imperial Federation’, appeared in the January issue, and sounded a note of panic. Jenkins warned his readers that the empire was in danger – threatened by politicians who were unable to exercise effective control over the movement of events. ‘This is the period of Drift’, Jenkins asserted, as the country was being ‘[s]‌wept along by

in History, empire, and Islam
Abstract only
Michael D. Leigh

maintained by wellqualified expatriate staffs. Their salaries, housing, travel, subsistence, pensions and school fees totted up to significant amounts that were far beyond the means of indigenous congregations to sustain. In this sense, mission buildings perpetuated cultures of imperial dependence and retarded, rather than encouraged, the development of autonomous ‘local’ churches. 46 Cox’s views are endorsed by David Hardiman’s study of medical missions in the Punjab and by Aylmer Shorter’s observation that unsympathetic white

in Conflict, politics and proselytism
Abstract only
Michael D. Leigh

officers, Baptists, Catholics and Anglicans – and particularly with their own Missionary Society in London. 53 Rev. H. Crawford Walters once complained that ‘on the back of the missionary falls all the burdens’. 54 Their relationships with other expatriates in Burma were particularly prickly. Colonials often disdained the Wesleyans and ridiculed their inhibitions. In 1889, when Winston described Upper Burma as ‘a fearfully wicked country’ he had in mind European rather than Burmese society. Bestall detested the lax morality of

in Conflict, politics and proselytism