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The politics of fear in Eastern Germany
Authors: Rebecca Pates and Julia Leser

Since 1990 the wolf has been a protected species in Germany; killing a wolf is a crime punishable by a prison sentence of up to five years. In Eastern Germany, where the political ground is shifting to the right, locals argue that the wolves are not German but Western Polish, undeserving of protection since they have invaded Saxon territory and threatened the local way of life. Many people in Eastern Germany feel that the wolf, like the migrant, has been a problem for years, but that nobody in power is listening to them. At a time when nationalist parties are on the rise everywhere in Europe, The wolves are coming back offers an insight into the rise of Eastern German fringe political movements and agitation against both migrants and wolves by hunters, farmers, rioters and self-appointed saviours of the nation. The nationalist Alternative for Germany (AfD) represents the third-largest party in the German federal parliament, with representation in the vast majority of German states. It draws much of its support from regions that have been referred to as the ‘post-traumatic places’ in Eastern Germany, structured by realities of disownment, disenfranchisement and a lack of democratic infrastructure. Pates and Leser provide an account of the societal roots of a new group of radical right parties, whose existence and success we always assumed to be impossible.

Inter-regionalism and the crisis of globalisation
José Antonio Sanahuja and Jorge Damián Rodríguez

. However, by the time Argentina and Brazil announced their intention to “return to the world” and re-embrace globalisation, globalisation itself had become elusive and entered in a deep crisis. When MERCOSUR sought to attract foreign investment and relaunch trade negotiations, no positive response was forthcoming from the rich world. International trade started to show growing signs of fragmentation, and, since 2016, the rise of new nationalist and far-right political actors has brought protectionism and contestation of multilateral institutions and rules. In this

in Latin America–European Union relations in the twenty-first century
Abstract only
Rebecca Pates and Julia Leser

hysteria’ and for being ‘alarmist’. This kind of discourse is intended to vilify the Greens. 16 The far right is frequently presented as engaging in overly affective politics by harnessing and amplifying a multiplicity of negative emotions. Far-right politics is said to be characterised by the use of fear, 17 the rhetorics of rage and anger, 18 and expressions of hatred. 19 Yet a few problems arise from a dualistic and normative conception of the political affects on the far right. 20 Whilst negative emotions are considered only in the context of far-right politics

in The wolves are coming back
Rebecca Pates and Julia Leser

thus not the wolf that is like the migrant but the migrant who takes on similar meanings to the cipher of the wolf. In far-right politics, the wolf thus serves as a figure to construe a (predominantly) rural population as vulnerable to infiltrating populations of predators who have been invited in by urban dwellers who remain luxuriously far removed from the consequences of their decisions.

in The wolves are coming back
Rebecca Pates and Julia Leser

Nazi past would work as a political ‘handicap’ for far-right political agents. 33 Now, however, the stigma is used as a resource for far-right parties. ‘Germany – Never again!’ In Eastern Germany there has been a historically different understanding of the ‘problematic’ German nation that has led to a greater attention to the governance of problematic ‘leftist’ nationalisms. In particular, during reunification, a left-wing political movement called the Antideutsche Bewegung (Anti-German Movement) emerged that rejected every form of German nationalism per se

in The wolves are coming back
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Rethinking the relationship between capitalism, communism, and democracy
Costas Panayotakis

they make it possible for far right political forces to channel popular discontent with the status quo in a reactionary direction. This is not the only lesson that the left and humanity have to draw from recent history. The rise of neoliberalism has laid to rest the illusion, stemming from capitalism’s brief golden age immediately after World War II, that it is possible to humanize capitalism by subjecting it to democratic controls. The Cold War context of that period contributed to this illusion in a number of ways. On the one hand, it put pressure on capitalist

in The capitalist mode of destruction
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Depopulation, deindustrialisation, colonialism
Rebecca Pates and Julia Leser

many people became unemployed, tens of thousands, practically overnight. If you go to Eastern Saxony today, right at the border to Poland and the Czech Republic, you’ll find a lot of abandoned houses, inner city centres which are empty, and only older people on the streets, because most of the young people left. We lost two generations actually here in the last twenty years. 56 A narrative of depopulation and ‘empty villages’ without any women left to reproduce becomes prone to being exploited by far-right politics and filled with anxieties about the future. As the

in The wolves are coming back
Rebecca Pates and Julia Leser

fallback will become the position from which we shall sally forth to kick off the reconquista. 21 For these far-right political agents, ‘national rebirth’ has a time and a place: it is set in former Eastern Germany. Teleologically, the narrative ends not in the catastrophe of the Germans dying out but in salvation from the brink of catastrophe. These narratives of ‘great replacement’, ‘national resistance’ and ‘national rebirth’ were not invented by the AfD. In fact, most of these ideas date back to the nineteenth century, and today, with the rise of the right we

in The wolves are coming back
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Imogen Richards

-economic developments regarding neo-jihadism from 2017 to 2020, and within the global economic system. It incorporates comparative consideration of other political philosophies and movements, from anarchism and left-wing activism to the GWOT and a twenty-first-century rise in far-right politics and (neo-)fascism. Furthermore, I elaborate a brief consideration of evolutionary developments within the phenomenon of neo-jihadism, including several forecasts of the political activities of AQ and IS. Drawing on theoretical and strategic inferences about the variegated nature of neo

in Neoliberalism and neo-jihadism
Open Access (free)
Kevin Harrison and Tony Boyd

, slightly increased his shared of the vote to almost 17 per cent, pushing Lionel Jospin, the Socialist candidate, out of the race altogether. Le Pen’s subsequent defeat in the final vote (gaining only 18 per cent share of the vote) did not remove the impression that fascism had become a major political force in France, giving encouragement to far-right political parties across Europe. This impression was not entirely removed by

in Understanding political ideas and movements