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Meanings of development and the ordering of (im)mobility
Luke de Noronha

Chapter 8 Deportation as foreign policy: meanings of development and the ordering of (im)mobility In the last chapter, I developed a critical account of citizenship from the perspective of the ‘deportee’. I described people’s struggles post-deportation, with a particular focus on Chris’s experiences in East Kingston, and argued that poverty, insecurity and frustrated mobilities characterise citizenship for Jamaica’s poor more generally. In this sense, the effective immobilisation of ‘deportees’ is symptomatic of the wider function of citizenship as a global

in Deporting Black Britons
A case study of South Africa’s hosting of the 2010 FIFA Football World Cup
Suzanne Dowse

concerning the position of ‘Middle Powers’ within the international community and suggest that South Africa’s political elite prioritised the foreign policy potential of the event to the detriment of the heavily promoted domestic goals which were used to justify the significant public subsidy involved.7 Policy documents and interviews with key policy stakeholders confirmed that the political elite viewed the FWC as a means of improving the country’s regional and international standing. The expectation among that elite was that this would develop meaningful foreign policy

in Sport and diplomacy
The politics of Hmong refugee resettlement in the United States
Chia Youyee Vang

anticommunism became the foundation of American foreign policy during the Cold War and refugees who fled to the West were perceived as “voting with their feet” (Zucker and Zucker, 1996 : 28). This “gift of freedom,” moreover, did not necessarily provide a safe haven for all refugees. Instead, refugees faced new forms of violence as they sought freedom in the United States and were rendered indebted to empire without end (Nguyen, 2012 : 19–20). In other words, refugees feel the need to perpetually be thankful to the US nation for having rescued them from evil communism. It

in Displacement
Between humanitarianism and pragmatism
Alexis Heraclides
and
Ada Dialla

Department of the Russian Foreign Ministry) were brought to the attention of the wider Russian public and not only to elite circles. We will also include the contemporary critique of Russia’s policy and the questioning of whether its humanitarian motives were pure. Russian foreign policy and the Eastern Question, 1856–78 The overall picture The geo-schizophrenia’ 1 of Russia, situated between Europe and Asia, created in the

in Humanitarian intervention in the long nineteenth century
Khaled Abou El Fadl

as the United States agreed to be held accountable, they often zealously backed governments with abysmal human rights records, such as that of Iran under the Shah. The U.S. was willing to pretend that friends like Israel and South Africa did not engage in discrimination. It verbally condemned but in effect ignored human rights abuses by countries such as Saudi Arabia. Inconsistency, hypocrisy, or multiple standards infected the foreign policies of the supposed champions of rights. 51 Muslims have swung back and forth between the idealism and realism of the West

in ‘War on terror’
Open Access (free)
Alexis Heraclides
and
Ada Dialla

depiction of the state of play in the nineteenth century, the golden age of traditional diplomacy, with the making of foreign policy in the hands of a small elite circle of foreign ministers, ambassadors (and other professional diplomats), monarchs, presidents (in the US case) and prime ministers, and a limited number of figures inside and outside government. This small circle shaped foreign policy and kept it away from the ‘prying eyes’ of an increasingly vocal public. As

in Humanitarian intervention in the long nineteenth century
Alexis Heraclides
and
Ada Dialla

peaceful involvement, mainly mediation attempts. This can be discerned in the foreign policy initiatives of the two main rivals of Metternich on the European scene, Ioannis Capodistrias 4 (co-Foreign Minister of Russia, with Nesselrode) and George Canning as British Foreign Secretary. 5 A major concern (then and now) was finding the most propitious international reaction in instances of protracted internal wars. One approach was the cordon sanitaire , the sealing off of a

in Humanitarian intervention in the long nineteenth century
Jonathan Benthall

Hillary Clinton, to lift the ban against Ramadan’s entering the United States, which he has since done on a number of times without incident. Almost certainly, the real grounds for the exclusion of Ramadan were different. A grandson of Hassan al-Banna, founder of the Muslim Brotherhood, he was a critic of American foreign policy and believed in some American circles to be

in Islamic charities and Islamic humanism in troubled times
Thomas Dublin

leaders whether or not the war is justified; this phenomenon was seen with Margaret Thatcher’s controversial Falklands/Malvinas War and with George Bush’s re-election in 2004 in an election contested largely on the grounds of foreign policy and ‘national security’. But the November 2006 elections in the U.S. provided a clear statement of popular opposition to the war in Iraq. In the House of Representatives, Democrats, running largely on their opposition to the war, gained 31 seats and took control of that body. In the Senate only a third of the seats were contested

in ‘War on terror’
Author:

Deporting Black Britons provides an ethnographic account of deportation from the UK to Jamaica. It traces the painful stories of four men who were deported after receiving criminal convictions in the UK. For each of the men, all of whom had moved to the UK as children, deportation was lived as exile – from parents, partners, children and friends – and the book offers portraits of survival and hardship in both the UK and Jamaica. Based on over four years of research, Deporting Black Britons describes the human consequences of deportation, while situating deportation stories within the broader context of policy, ideology, law and violence. It examines the relationship between racism, criminalisation and immigration control in contemporary Britain, suggesting new ways of thinking about race, borders and citizenship in these anti-immigrant times. Ultimately, the book argues that these stories of exile and banishment should orient us in the struggle against violent immigration controls, in the UK and elsewhere.