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How the movements were framed
Phil Edwards

5 ‘Repudiate all forms of intolerance’: how the movements were framed Framing the news, framing disorder This chapter analyses the key framing strategies employed by the PCI’s daily paper l’Unità in relation to the key movements of the second cycle. The period has been divided into three phases: innovation, running roughly from March 1972 to the end of 1973; diffusion, from 1974 to the end of 1976; and engagement, from December 1976 to December 1977. L’Unità makes a good source on the PCI’s framing strategies for three main reasons. The paper at this time was a

in ‘More work! Less pay!’
Aaron Edwards

Ireland Act (1920): You will know that the legal position is that while the United Kingdom Government is opposed to all forms of discrimination on religious or other grounds, most of the matters regarding which discrimination is alleged in Northern Ireland fall within the field of responsibility of the Northern Ireland Government. 42 The tone of this riposte was typical of the bureaucratic replies sent to the McCluskeys at this time. The fact that the BLP’s General Secretary, Len Williams, passed correspondence on to the Home Secretary, who in turn brought his

in A history of the Northern Ireland Labour Party
Aaron Edwards

local labour force, low levels of war production, the absence of conscription and Unionism’s general apathy towards civil defence all impacted negatively on the local regime. 4 Doubts were soon raised over the province’s actual contribution to the war effort. True to form, many Unionist leaders began to make the calculated sectarian argument that such despondency was largely attributable to the influx of Southern migrant workers into Belfast. An extension of the British social welfare state to Northern Ireland and the tackling of acute unemployment were huge

in A history of the Northern Ireland Labour Party
Open Access (free)
Humanitarianism in a Post-Liberal World Order
Stephen Hopgood

Introduction The modern global humanitarian system takes the form it does because it is underpinned by liberal world order, the post-1945 successor to the imperial world of the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries and the global political and economic system the European empires created. Humanitarian space, as we have come to know it in the late twentieth century, is liberal space, even if many of those engaged in humanitarian action would rather not see themselves as liberals. To the extent that there is something constitutively

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
David Rieff

don’t have the power to make good on whatever has been agreed. And this is assuming major Western governments still believe it to be important to support relief agencies. The political landscape in which the humanitarian movement took current form has changed radically. Even a ‘centrist restoration’ in the US and Europe might not be enough to prevent this movement’s relative decline. In Giuseppe di Lampedusa’s The Leopard , one of the principle characters says of the revolutionary era in which the novel is set: ‘For things to remain the same

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
How Can Humanitarian Analysis, Early Warning and Response Be Improved?
Aditya Sarkar
,
Benjamin J. Spatz
,
Alex de Waal
,
Christopher Newton
, and
Daniel Maxwell

? ‘Armed conflict’ is commonly reduced to a dummy variable in analyses of the causes and dynamics of acute food security crises, while ‘political will’ (or lack thereof) substitutes for a lack of analysis of the logic of elite political actions. We assess how the PMF might open up these analytical ‘black boxes’ and thereby help explain the dynamics that lead to such crises. 2. How can understanding PM systems complement other forms of humanitarian analysis to

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Expanding Gender Norms to Marriage Drivers Facing Boys and Men in South Sudan
Michelle Lokot
,
Lisa DiPangrazio
,
Dorcas Acen
,
Veronica Gatpan
, and
Ronald Apunyo

observe that the age of child marriage is rising ( Koski et al. , 2017 ). Different to South Asia, where most of the research on child marriage has occurred, girls in some African countries have greater autonomy in choosing a spouse ( Petroni et al. , 2017 ). Humanitarian agencies have frequently framed CEFM as a form of gender-based violence (GBV) ( Plan International, 2018 : 1; CARE, 2014 ), and this framework has also been presented by others ( Belhorma, 2016 ). The practice of child marriage is influenced by multiple drivers which vary depending on the context

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Humanity and Solidarity
Tanja R. Müller
and
Róisín Read

This is the second general issue of the Journal of Humanitarian Affairs , following in the wake of two themed issues on Extreme Violence, and Gender and Humanitarianism respectively. It comes at a time when COVID-19 has resulted in rising global inequalities, including those based on gender, and the spectre of famine has returned to public consciousness – for example, in northern Ethiopia. Gender and violence – the latter of a more indirect form – both feature in this issue, as do

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Phoebe Shambaugh

. This issue also marks our entry into the third year of the COVID-19 pandemic. Each of the previous general issue introductions have used the pandemic as a thread; this one will be no exception. As we enter a new phase of ‘opening-up’ (I write in February 2022) and ‘return to normalcy’ in the Global North, we mark heightening tensions and renewed violence geopolitically, with new forms of misinformation, posturing and political division. The pandemic continues to heighten inequalities in wealth and quality of life, both within and across national borders. Nevertheless

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Valérie Gorin
and
Sönke Kunkel

be found? And what could they learn from each other? This special issue uses the past and present of humanitarian communication as a point of departure to begin a joint reflection on the possibilities and potentials of more collaboration. Our focus is particularly on visual media. Together, historians and practitioners discuss the role of visual media in humanitarian communication, ask how this role has formed out historically, and explore what changes it may be undergoing currently. The forum

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs