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Carmen M. Mangion

3 Forming a novice1 Train well. Teach much, lay good strong foundations, and let a determined will and God’s grace do the rest.2 As young girls and women, daughters were taught according to a curriculum that included the practical details of running a home, their spiritual and moral responsibilities and suitable social and charitable obligations.3 The importance of this ‘moral motherhood’4 in the nineteenth century led to a wide array of women’s conduct manuals that instructed mothers on the appropriate training of daughters. Sean Gill has suggested that the

in Contested identities
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Bulletin of the John Rylands Library
Rendel Harris
Bulletin of the John Rylands Library
C. H. Dodd
Bulletin of the John Rylands Library
Bulletin of the John Rylands Library
Victoria Joule

In this article I demonstrate the significance of a flexible approach to examining the autobiographical in early eighteenth-century womens writing. Using ‘old stories’, existing and developing narrative and literary forms, womens autobiographical writing can be discovered in places other than the more recognizable forms such as diaries and memoirs. Jane Barker and Delarivier Manley‘s works are important examples of the dynamic and creative use of cross-genre autobiographical writing. The integration of themselves in their fictional and poetic works demonstrates the potential of generic fluidity for innovative ways to express and explore the self in textual forms.

Bulletin of the John Rylands Library
Zoë Kinsley

This article considers the ways in which eighteenth-century womens travel narratives function as autobiographical texts, examining the process by which a travellers dislocation from home can enable exploration of the self through the observation and description of place. It also, however, highlights the complexity of the relationship between two forms of writing which a contemporary readership viewed as in many ways distinctly different. The travel accounts considered, composed (at least initially) in manuscript form, in many ways contest the assumption that manuscript travelogues will somehow be more self-revelatory than printed accounts. Focusing upon the travel writing of Lady Mary Wortley Montagu, Katherine Plymley, Caroline Lybbe Powys and Dorothy Richardson, the article argues for a more historically nuanced approach to the reading of womens travel writing and demonstrates that the narration of travel does not always equate to a desired or successful narration of the self.

Bulletin of the John Rylands Library
Beverly Louise Brown

Marcantonio Raimondis Il Sogno and Albrecht Dürers Sea Monster share a number of compositional similarities as well as a fascination with the bizarre. The association of monstrous forms as an omen of grave misfortune, including pestilence and war, was particularly common at the beginning of the sixteenth century. In Marcantonios engraving the chimeric monsters, billowing inferno and shooting star can be perceived as a graphic warning that by 1509 Venices world was in deep peril.

Bulletin of the John Rylands Library
Chris Perkins and Martin Dodge

Visual representations have often played a crucial role in imagining future urban forms. In the aftermath of the Second World War, a noteworthy new genre of urban plan was published in Britain, most deploying seductively optimistic illustrations of ways forward not only for the reconstruction of bomb-damaged towns and cities but also for places left largely undamaged. Visual representations have often played a crucial role in imagining future urban forms. In the aftermath of the Second World War, a noteworthy new genre of urban plan was published in Britain, most deploying seductively optimistic illustrations of ways forward not only for the reconstruction of bomb-damaged towns and cities but also for places left largely undamaged. This paper assesses the contribution of visual elements in this,process with a detailed case study of the maps, statistical charts, architectural drawings and photographs enrolled into the 1945 City of Manchester Plan. The cultural production of these visual representations is evaluated. Our analysis interprets the form, symbology and active work of different imagery in the process of reimagining Manchester, but also assesses the role of these images as markers of a particular moment in the cultural economy of the city. This analysis is carried out in relation to the ethos of the Plan as a whole.

Bulletin of the John Rylands Library
Patricia Emison

Marcantonio Raimondis career is here considered as a record of a distinctively Renaissance hunger for imagery, on the part of the literate as well as the illiterate, a taste that did not demand autograph work and yet was very attentive to the decisions made by artists about which subjects to portray and how to present them. Marcantonios contribution is described less in terms of having made Raphaels work known widely, and more as having made engraving into an established art form: collectible, discussable, debatable. His innovative technique yielded, it is argued, images of deliberately impersonal style, an accomplishment obscured by the ensuing emphasis on maniera.

Bulletin of the John Rylands Library