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Literary form and religious conflict in early modern England

This book explores a range of literary and theatrical forms as means of mediating religious conflict in early modern England. It deals with the specific ways available to mediate religious conflict, precisely because faith mattered more than many other social paradigms. The first part explores the ways in which specific religious rituals and related cultural practices were taken up by literary texts. In a compelling rereading of the final act of 'The Merchant of Venice', the book investigates the devotional differences informing early modern observances of Easter. Subsequently, it explores the ways in which Christmas provided a confessional bridge uniting different religious constituencies. Goodnight ballads were not only commercially successful pieces of public entertainment but also effective forms of predominantly Protestant religious persuasion. The book's consideration of Elizabethan romance links the literary form to the sacrament of the Eucharist, and argues that the Eucharist debate had an impact on Elizabethan romances. The second part 'Negotiating confessional conflict' provides a rereading of When You See Me You Know Me, exposing the processes of religious reform as an on-going means of mediating the new normality of confessional plurality. It examines the potential of the tragic form by a reading of the play The White Devil, and discusses the ideological fault line in the views of witchcraft. The book also shows that Henry V anticipates later sermons of John Donne that served to promote 'an interrogative conscience'.

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Carmen M. Mangion

3 Forming a novice1 Train well. Teach much, lay good strong foundations, and let a determined will and God’s grace do the rest.2 As young girls and women, daughters were taught according to a curriculum that included the practical details of running a home, their spiritual and moral responsibilities and suitable social and charitable obligations.3 The importance of this ‘moral motherhood’4 in the nineteenth century led to a wide array of women’s conduct manuals that instructed mothers on the appropriate training of daughters. Sean Gill has suggested that the

in Contested identities
The parables of the Wedding Feast and Great Supper
Mary Raschko

Paradox formed into story 177 5 Paradox formed into story: the parables of the Wedding Feast and Great Supper Thus comparisunez Kryst þe kyndom of heuen To þis frelych feste þat fele arn to called; For alle arn laþed luflyly, þe luþer and þe better, Þat euer wern fulȝed in font, þat fest to haue. (Cleanness, 161–4)1 This final chapter returns to the parable of the Wedding Feast (Matt 22:1–14), a story fraught with contradictions, both within the narrative itself and in its relation to other Gospel stories. The Wedding Feast is a paradigmatic parable: it is

in The politics of Middle English parables
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repair of all windows with new mullions in 1845, and to the arrangement of figure subjects of modern glass inserted in some windows in 1866 and 1869. 2 The second indication, about the design of the east wall of the quire looking into the Lady chapel, is a black and white photograph that forms a frontispiece to the 1910 Transactions of the Lancashire and Cheshire Antiquarian Society . 3 This illustration shows the lower section of the east window and interior windows of the Lady chapel completely filled with

in Manchester Cathedral
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have since gone missing. 11 Unanswered questions also surround the worn and incomplete brass of Sir John Byrom and his wife Margaret (now outside Jesus chapel), which was originally set on a Purbeck marble stone on the floor of the Lady chapel. Dating from the second half of the fifteenth century and attributed to a London workshop, in its original form ‘there were canopies over each of the figures’ but over the centuries it became extremely worn, the Revd Ernest Letts noting that it was among the fragments of brasses

in Manchester Cathedral
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Michael Carter-Sinclair

Christian Social antisemitism: violence in many forms Between the middle of the nineteenth century and the middle of the twentieth, parts of Europe, to varying degrees, were subject to outbreaks of antisemitism. These outbreaks might be spontaneous or organised. They might take the form of damage to, or the destruction of, Jewish religious buildings. They might be state-organised pogroms, or boycotts of Jewish-owned businesses; but they all marked Jews as ‘outsiders.’ Images of brown-shirted Nazi thugs, abusing Jews in the street or burning books or

in Vienna’s ‘respectable’ antisemites
Origins and early development

channel which drained into the Irwell. The early street pattern suggests that this channel may have been deliberately extended to form a curving defensive line between the two rivers. The medieval core was not the first known centre of occupation in the city. Manchester was the site of a Roman auxiliary fort and a large civilian settlement or vicus , but these lay in Castlefield at the opposite end of Deansgate, itself originally a main Roman road heading north. Antiquarians supposed that there was also Roman occupation

in Manchester Cathedral
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Cheshire Antiquarian Society . Plan of the Cathedral by J. S. Crowther The church is the result of substantial rebuilding which took place after a college of priests was formed in 1421. There seem to have been several campaigns of building during the fifteenth century which were apparently instigated or overseen by successive wardens of the College. The founders of the College and the complex web of connections and influences

in Manchester Cathedral
Michael Carter-Sinclair

confronted both, as liberals rose in Vienna and other German-speaking centres, while Hungarians and Italians demanded the creation of independent nation-states. Within and beyond the Austrian Empire, some German speakers fought at barricades for the cause of German unification as a single German state. Most revolutionaries intended the German Confederation to form the basis of a unified Germany, but it was unclear whether the ‘German lands’ of the Habsburgs should be included. In the autumn of 1848, the matter seemed to be resolved when revolutionaries offered Friedrich

in Vienna’s ‘respectable’ antisemites
Michael Carter-Sinclair

shared ‘love, inner gratitude and deepest honour.’ 29 These same feelings, according to Piffl, bound the rulers and peoples of the Empire into an organism with an unconquerable life force: ‘In the awesome, heroic figure of our Emperor is the idea of state that unites all peoples.’ This was a direct statement of support for the Habsburg Staatsidee , the idea behind a particular form of organisation of state and society: a monarchical and aristocratic, hierarchically organised, world, with rulers and subjects and, in this case, a multinational state of many peoples

in Vienna’s ‘respectable’ antisemites