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Waiting for freedom
Liene Ozoliņa

letters asking in Latvian ‘Where is your responsibility?’ (Kur ir tava atbildība?). The stencil made me wince – the audacity of the question! The admonishment! – but it also struck me because it was unlike any graffiti I had seen, either in Riga or any other city. Graffiti was usually a genre for Epilogue 119 speaking back to power, a way of challenging the hegemonic norms both in terms of its message as well as via the illegal format itself. Yet here was a stencil that sounded like some of the civil servants or policy makers I had been interviewing about the

in Politics of waiting
Open Access (free)
Recorded memories and diasporic identity in the archive of Giuseppe Chiaffitella
Nicola Scaldaferri

creation of preconceptions as much as they were creating communities. Many records of southern Italian music, for example, were full of references to the Sicilian Mafia (Fugazzotto 2010 ). The importance of musical practices and sound recordings for maintaining identities in diasporic communities is even more crucial wherever the connection with the country of origin is less clearly defined and the imaginary component is more pronounced. A good example is provided by Shelemay in her work on Syrian Jews: it is a musical genre, the Pizmon, that is crucial to preserving a

in Sonic ethnography
Open Access (free)
Corpse-work in the prehistory of political boundaries
Richard Kernaghan

resonance or echo they set in motion. What they invoked was not merely a general commandment against stealing. They seemed to allude to a well-known maxim that the Shining Path had frequently laid on the dead bodies of its victims so as to convert them into criminal types and thereby serve notice to all who came upon them: ‘This is how thieves die …’ ‘Así mueren los rateros …’ With messages like this, Maoist insurgents transformed corpses into a means of rural governance. Though the warning on the crates indirectly referenced a regional genre of political threat, there

in Governing the dead
Liene Ozoliņa

genre in Latvia where we can pick up key nodes of the normative discourse. In a famous example of this peculiar home-grown genre, the PM Andris Šķēle said on the eve of 1996 that Latvians had to start brushing their teeth and washing their pants if they wanted to succeed in the new market democracy. His was a blunt way of condemning the post-Soviet subjects’ alleged passiveness and reluctance to take their fate into their own hands. These words about the seven fat years coming were alluding to the recent growth of the economy and people’s wages, following the long

in Politics of waiting
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Broken relations, migrant destiny
Paul Carter

identifiable context or conversation and on this account readily recruited to new contexts and applications. In my experience, the migrant artist's encounters are similarly promiscuous. It would be difficult to stratify the different genres in which I have played: radio art did not yield to typographical engravings in public places; writing and directing performance works in and outside the theatre did not lay the foundations of a later discovery of my true metier in cross-cultural urban design. A critic once described my interests as polyhedral, referring to the coexistence

in Translations, an autoethnography
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Human symbols, doubled identities
Paul Carter

the literalism’. This is migrant humour, it integrates ‘mere contingence’ and ‘necessity’. No shared normative horizon of historical irony exists that can be invoked; it has to be produced, improvised, from mere coincidences that are meaningful because they are meaningless. The image of solidarity is the telling, the making, of a joke. The genre is Parallels Antithetic. The symbolon , sentient and semiotic, displays a disposition to relate: like Aristophanes's lover looking for their other half, the migrant, constituted by the host–guest contingency of his

in Translations, an autoethnography
Notes on developing a photo-ethnographic practice in Basilicata
Lorenzo Ferrarini

and brown peoples as subject (Ruby 1996 ). It makes more sense, then, to consider what constitutes photographing as an anthropologist rather than an anthropological photograph. A focus on the approach also has the benefit of avoiding scholasticism and keeping open a multitude of genres and styles that each situation and research question might call for, including those outside of realism and even outside documentary photography. Patrick Sutherland expresses himself along similar lines when considering the key aspect of photo-ethnography to be the

in Sonic ethnography
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My exhausted and exhausting building
Mona Abaza

actually emanates from the United States, an American invention that dates back as early as 1928. According to Stephen Graham, the music was meant to appease fears of delays and breakdowns (Graham 2014: 244). Elevator phobia seems to be widespread amongst Cairenes, but it is not necessarily culturally specific, since American history displays identical fears related to this installation. Scores of Cairene elevators are ideal spaces for staging claustrophobic horror films, which is of course a well-established genre in the American film industry. Still, almost all my

in Cairo collages
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Commute
Mona Abaza

Nawara (2015), directed by Hala Khalil, starring Menna Shalabi and Mahmud Hemmeida. 8 ‘Fawq mustawa al-shubuhaat’, 2016. 9 I will focus here on Ahmad Naaji’s Istikhdaam al-Hayaat (The Use of Life, 2014), Basma ‘Abd al-‘Aziz’s al-Taabuur (The Queue, 2013), and Muhamad Rabii‘’s ‘Utaarid (Mercury, 2014), which is the name of the policeman and protagonist of the novel. 10 I am aware that these three novels are not the first in the Arabic dystopian genre. 11 Masked snipers evoke, in the collective memory, the early days of January 2011, when they killed a large

in Cairo collages
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Migrant poetics
Paul Carter

household chores’ (See www.robertburns.org/encyclopedia/DavidsonBetty.274.shtml ) and ‘the faithful servant’ of Major Lowsley (See https://limerickslife.com/military-cemetery/ ). 28 White Ladies were a staple of Victorian folklore and I suspect Dawson's name referred to a human genre not a physical appearance. 29

in Translations, an autoethnography