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Visual Advocacy in the Early Decades of Humanitarian Cinema
Valérie Gorin

, it but serves to emphasize the reports, which for several months past have been reaching the outer world, of conditions which obtain in the stricken areas. ( Record , 1922b : 151–2) Although it is impossible to know how the audience felt retrospectively, we can reflect on the injunctions to feel and care made in the films. The controversial films discussed above stand close to another visual genre – that of atrocity images. As with certain photographic cases used in transnational networks – who denounced abuses in the colonies ( Twomey, 2012 ) – atrocity images

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Writing about Personal Experiences of Humanitarianism
Róisín Read
,
Tony Redmond
, and
Gareth Owen

decisions of poor leaders that led to such unnecessary violence and tragedy – as if Somalia had not seen enough of that already. RR: You both have mentioned other writings which influenced your work, but you don’t say a lot about other humanitarian memoirs. I wonder what your perception of humanitarian memoir as a genre was before you started writing? Here I’m wondering not just about the role they play in communicating the experiences of the sector to a wider audience, but also the potential role they play in generating a humanitarian nostalgia or myths about the

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Cerwyn Moore

and somewhat problematic reading of epic and history in the work of Koljević, features of this mode of story-telling are nonetheless helpful. The epic not only demonstrates a series of overlaps with the story of the nation, but also helps to establish boundaries, produce fears and insecurities, and capture emotions and moments of glory. The more recent, what may be called critical analyses of epics, highlight how they rest in studies of genre, produce complex histories and generate complicated fields of interpretation.9 Here then it may be useful to turn to an

in Contemporary violence
Towards interpretive pluralism
Cerwyn Moore

beyond textual hermeneutics, revolves around the way not only how texts are interpreted, but also how they are carried forward through stories. Narrativists note that stories can have a sequential order that connects ‘events in a meaningful way for a definite audience, and thus offer insights about the world and/or people’s experiences of it’.18 But these mix, merge and blend with literary and historical genres, and shape slices of life. But this is more than just a starting point: it helps to link work in the fields of hermeneutic, narrative and literary IR, precisely

in Contemporary violence
Andrew Williams

issues until the end of the Versailles Conference. They also provided a number of key personnel at Versailles itself, especially Tyrrell, Nicolson, Vansittart and Rex Leeper. The PID was clearly initially seen as suspect both by the Foreign Office establishment and by the Establishment in the wider sense. This was a group of ‘experts’, a genre viewed with great suspicion at the time, and moreover a group of sixteen experts who were of a very ‘catholic’ background. The need for it was nonetheless widely realised by the end of the Conference, and General Smuts, who

in Failed imagination?
Abstract only
The end
Alexander Spencer

political phenomena outside of the romantic story genre. The story of the book The theoretical and methodological contribution of this work has been to illustrate the narrative nature of international politics. The book has argued that the idea of a narrative adopted from literary studies and narratology is helpful as it offers both an explanation for why narratives matter in the first place as well as providing a conceptual framework for the empirical analysis of narratives. Narratives are important for international politics from both a cognitive and a cultural

in Romantic narratives in international politics
Alexander Spencer

these settings are individually and subjectively constituted, they draw on culturally embedded story genres which are commonly shared throughout society and are thereby intersubjective. A setting is, however, never complete, as it cannot show or describe the whole ‘story world’ or universe in which the story is taking place. It always has to leave spaces which can be filled by the reader’s or viewer’s imagination. 28 Romantic narratives in international politics In addition, the setting is not only a passive background picture which provides the colourful backdrop

in Romantic narratives in international politics
Abstract only
Once upon a time …
Alexander Spencer

for “a narrative,” because what matters to us are individual narrative genres’ (Ryan 2007: 32), such as tragedy, comedy or in this case romance. To show the intertextuality and persistence or relative absence of narratives and in particular romantic narratives, the empirical chapters of this book will focus on three realms of political narrative in Germany, Britain and the United States of America. This will include the narratives told by the political elite in parliamentary debates and speeches, media narratives found in print news media as well as cultural

in Romantic narratives in international politics
Zalfa Feghali

-​first-​century fiction, the novel has been described by Alison Flood as ‘the best novel of the 21st century to date’.3 Critics credit Díaz with having crafted a novel that fuses ‘science fiction, fantasy, and testosterone’.4 Similarly, in his review of the novel, Christopher Taylor notes Díaz’s success in ‘coupling the book’s interest in genre to the creolisation he values in Caribbean culture’.5 Taylor is perhaps simplistic in his appeal to creolisation, but he is right in identifying the hybrid character of the novel, which is foregrounded by Díaz from the outset. Indeed, as the

in Crossing borders and queering citizenship
Zalfa Feghali

through their narrative strategies and choice of genre. As Albert E. Stone puts it, ‘autobiography is a rich cultural medium for exploring the necessary interplay between the particular and the general’, and for Allison, an opportunity ‘to claim my family, my true history, and to tell the truth not only about who I was but about the temptation to lie’ (Skin p. 34).33 Further, Allison acknowledges that ‘writing Bastard Out of Carolina became, ultimately, the way to claim my family’s pride and tragedy’ (Skin p. 34). If, as Stone puts it, ‘An autobiographical act

in Crossing borders and queering citizenship