Search results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 71 items for :

  • "horror cinema" x
  • Manchester Film and Media Studies x
  • Refine by access: All content x
Clear All
Horror cinema, historical trauma and national identity
Author: Linnie Blake

This book explores the ways in which the unashamedly disturbing conventions of international horror cinema allow audiences to engage with the traumatic legacy of the recent past in a manner that has serious implications for the ways in which we conceive of ourselves both as gendered individuals and as members of a particular nation-state. Exploring a wide range of stylistically distinctive and generically diverse film texts, its analysis ranges from the body horror of the American 1970s to the avant-garde proclivities of German Reunification horror, from the vengeful supernaturalism of recent Japanese chillers and their American remakes to the post-Thatcherite masculinity horror of the UK and the resurgence of hillbilly horror in the period following 9/11 USA. In each case, it is argued that horror cinema forces us to look again at the wounds inflicted on individuals, families, communities and nations by traumatic events such as genocide and war, terrorist outrage and seismic political change, wounds that are all too often concealed beneath ideologically expedient discourses of national cohesion. Thus proffering a radical critique of the nation-state and the ideologies of identity it promulgates, horror cinema is seen to offer us a disturbing, yet perversely life affirming, means of working through the traumatic legacy of recent times.

Exclusions and Exchanges in the History of European Horror Cinema
Peter Hutchings

British horror cinema is often excluded from critical work dealing with European horror cinema or, as it is frequently referred to, Eurohorror. This article argues that such exclusion is unwarranted. From the 1950s onwards there have been many exchanges between British and continental European-based horror production. These have involved not just international co-production deals but also creative per- sonnel moving from country to country. In addition, British horror films have exerted influence on European horror cinema and vice versa. At the same time, the exclusion of British horror from the Eurohorror category reveals limitations in that category, particularly its idealisation of continental European horror production.

Film Studies
Lorraine Yeung

This article investigates the emotive potency of horror soundtracks. The account illuminates the potency of aural elements in horror cinema to engage spectators body in the light of a philosophical framework of emotion, namely, the embodied appraisal theories of emotion. The significance of aural elements in horror cinema has been gaining recognition in film studies. Yet it still receives relatively scarce attention in the philosophical accounts of film music and cinematic horror, which tend to underappreciate the power of horror film sound and music in inducing emotions. My investigation aims both to address the lacuna, and facilitate dialogue between the two disciplines.

Film Studies
Abstract only
Horror cinema and traumatic events
Linnie Blake

Conclusion: horror cinema and traumatic events In exploring the response of genre films from Japan and Germany, the United States and the United Kingdom to the traumatic social, cultural and personal legacies of the Second World War, Vietnam and 9/11 and to the broader cultural changes engendered by transformations to traditional gender roles since the 1970s, this study has engaged with a number of debates drawn from horror film scholarship, trauma theory, post-colonial studies and cultural studies. Specifically though, it has been concerned with the ways in

in The wounds of nations
Exclusions and exchanges in the history of European horror
Peter Hutchings

particular, both British and Italian horror cycles. 2 However, from another perspective, one that is expressed very clearly by 100 European Horror Films , British horror is a much less welcome presence in the world of European horror, and indeed its exclusion helps to underpin in a fundamental way a sense of what European horror actually is. In the face of this exclusion, this chapter seeks to identify and characterise the relationship between British horror cinema and European horror cinema, and

in Hammer and beyond
Abstract only
Russ Hunter

experts in horror cinema. What would he be like? Would he pick apart every argument I’d tried to make? Would I end up running from the exam with my academic tail between my legs? I phoned a friend, who had recently had his PhD examined by Peter, to see what he was like. I needn’t have worried. When my viva finally arrived, I found Peter to be astute and searching in his line of questioning, but keenly interested to talk about my work because discussions about horror cinema genuinely interested him. He was

in Hammer and beyond
An introduction
Richard J. Hand and Jay McRoy

why horror film narratives remain a consistently successful source for adaptations, be they generic or thematic, in horror cinema, one need consider horror’s relation to the broad concept of myth . In his seminal study In Frankenstein’s Shadow: Myth, Monstrosity, and Nineteenth-Century Writing , Chris Baldick makes use of the concept of ‘myth’ à la Claude Lévi

in Monstrous adaptations
Abstract only
Traumatic events and international horror cinema
Linnie Blake

Introduction: traumatic events and international horror cinema In a catastrophic age … trauma itself may provide the very link between cultures: not as a simple understanding of the pasts of others but rather, within the traumas of contemporary history, as our ability to listen through the departures we have all taken from ourselves.1 Horror is everywhere the same.2 Since the late 1970s psychoanalytically informed and often Holocaust-focused academics have brought into being an interdisciplinary area within the Humanities known as Trauma Studies. Broadly

in The wounds of nations
Abstract only
From Dead of Night to The Quatermass Experiment
Peter Hutchings

which perverse sexuality – in the form of the Glueman, an apparently deranged magistrate who pours glue into the hair of various women – was seen as an integral part of rural life. 6 It is clear then that, while not without its precursors, Ealing Studios’ Dead of Night (Alberto Cavalcanti, Charles Crichton, Basil Dearden, Robert Hamer, 1945) is the first important recognisably British horror film. However, to view Dead of Night as marking the ‘birth’ of British horror cinema is rather problematic

in Hammer and beyond
Richard Matheson’s I Am Legend and Hammer’s The Night Creatures
Peter Hutchings

Originally published in Dan North (ed.), Sights Unseen: Unfinished British Films (Newcastle upon Tyne: Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2008), 53–69. I Am Legend : on (and off) screen ‘Begone! Van Helsing and Mina and Jonathan and blood-eyed Count and all.’ ( The Night Creatures ) The story of the relation between the vampire novel I Am Legend (1954) and horror cinema is, to put it mildly, convoluted. It begins in

in Hammer and beyond