Search results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 1,463 items for :

  • "human-rights" x
  • Refine by access: All content x
Clear All
The Oxford Amnesty Lectures 2007

This book examines the intersection between incarceration and human rights. It is about why independent inspection of places of custody is a necessary part of human rights protection, and how that independence is manifested and preserved in practice. Immigration and asylum policies ask crucial questions about national identity, about human rights, and about our values as compassionate citizens in an era of increasingly complex international challenges. The book deals with the future of prisons and shows how the vulnerable population has been unconscionably treated. To arrive at a proper diagnosis of the expansive use and abuse of the prison in the age of economic deregulation and social insecurity, it is imperative that we effect some analytic breaks with the gamut of established approaches to incarceration. The book explores the new realities of criminal confinement of persons with mental illness. It traces the efforts of New Right think-tanks, police chiefs and other policy entrepreneurs to export neoliberal penality to Europe, with England and Wales acting as an 'acclimatization chamber'. In a series of interventions, of which his Oxford Amnesty Lecture is but one, Loic Wacquant has in recent years developed an incisive and invaluable analysis of the rise and effects of what he calls the penal state.

International society and the International Criminal Court

This book takes the transatlantic conflict over the International Criminal Court (ICC) as the lens for an enquiry into the normative foundations of international society. It shows how the way in which actors refer to core norms of the international society, such as sovereignty and human rights, affect the process and outcome of international negotiations. The book offers an innovative take on the long-standing debate over sovereignty and human rights in international relations. It goes beyond the simple and sometimes ideological duality of sovereignty versus human rights by showing that they are not competing principles in international relations, as is often argued, but complement each other. The way in which the two norms and their relationship are understood lies at the core of actors' broader visions of world order. The book shows how competing interpretations of sovereignty and human rights and the different visions of world order that they imply fed into the transatlantic debate over the ICC and transformed this debate into a conflict over the normative foundations of international society.

The promotion of human rights in international politics
Author: M. Anne Brown

This book argues for greater openness in the ways we approach human rights and international rights promotion, and in so doing brings some new understanding to old debates. Starting with the realities of abuse rather than the liberal architecture of rights, it casts human rights as a language for probing the political dimensions of suffering. Seen in this context, the predominant Western models of right generate a substantial but also problematic and not always emancipatory array of practices. These models are far from answering the questions about the nature of political community that are raised by the systemic infliction of suffering. Rather than a simple message from ‘us’ to ‘them’, then, rights promotion is a long and difficult conversation about the relationship between political organisations and suffering. Three case studies are explored: the Tiananmen Square massacre, East Timor's violent modern history and the circumstances of indigenous Australians. The purpose of these discussions is not to elaborate on a new theory of rights, but to work towards rights practices that are more responsive to the spectrum of injury that we inflict and endure.

Negotiating for human rights protection and humanitarian access

Human rights and humanitarian diplomacy provides an up to date and accessible overview of the field, and serves as a practical guide to those seeking to engage in human rights work. Pease argues that while human rights are internationally recognised, important disagreements exist on definition, priority and implementation. With the help of human rights diplomacy, these differences can be bridged, and a new generation of human rights professionals will build better relationships.

Author: Ingi Iusmen

This book offers a timely exploration of the nature and scale of the emergent EU human rights regime by critically examining how and why EU intervention in human rights matters (with a key focus on child protection in Romania) as part of Eastern enlargement, has had feedback effects on the EU’s own institutional and policy structures. By drawing on the human rights conditionality (particularly in relation to children’s rights) as applied to Romania, this book demonstrates that the feedback effects regarding children’s rights have transformed the EU institutions’ role and scope in this policy area both in EU internal and external human rights dimensions. The process-tracing dimension illustrates why policy issues emerge on EU political agenda, which is in line with agenda-setting processes, and why they persist over time, which reflects historical institutionalist accounts. It is also shown that Eastern enlargement has raised the profile of Roma protection, international adoptions, the disabled and mental health at the EU level. The impact of these developments has been further reinforced by the constitutional and legal provisions included in the Lisbon Treaty. It is argued that Eastern enlargement along with the post-Lisbon constitutional changes have generated the emergence of a more robust and well-defined EU human rights regime in terms of its constitutional, legal and institutional clout.

Norms and realities
Karim A.A. Khan and Anna Kotzeva

The Union is founded on the principles of liberty, democracy, respect for human rights and fundamental freedoms, and the rule of law, principles which are common to Member States. TEU Article 6(1) 2 Introduction The

in The security dimensions of EU enlargement
Chantal Mouffe

9780719082542_C06.qxd 8/9/11 15:51 Page 121 6 Can human rights accommodate pluralism? Chantal Mouffe There are many ways to approach the topic selected for this year’s Oxford Amnesty Lectures. I have chosen to examine it from the following angle: Can human rights accommodate pluralism? I am especially interested in two questions: (1) Do human rights transcend cultural and religious differences? (2) What does the answer to this question imply for our understanding of democracy in a global context? I will begin by examining the supposedly universal relevance

in Religion and rights
From Eastern enlargement to the Lisbon Treaty and beyond
Ingi Iusmen

6 European Union human rights regime: from Eastern enlargement to the Lisbon Treaty and beyond The Nobel Peace Prize 2012 is awarded to [the] European Union as: ‘the Union and its forerunner have, for over six decades, contributed to the advancement of peace and reconciliation, democracy and human rights in Europe’. (Nobel Committee) Introduction This chapter examines the key features and scope of the emergent European Union (EU) human rights regime in the light of Eastern enlargement and the Lisbon Treaty provisions. The EU has been recently hailed as a

in Children’s rights, Eastern enlargement and the EU human rights regime
Dominant approaches
M. Anne Brown

THE IDEA OF human rights covers a complex and fragmentary terrain. As R. J. Vincent comments near the beginning of his work on human rights in international relations, ‘human rights’ is a readily used term that has become a ‘staple of world politics’, the meaning of which is by no means self-evident (1986: 7). After glossing the term as the ‘idea that humans have rights’ (1986: 7) – a deceptively simple approach – Vincent notes that this is a profoundly contested territory, philosophically as well as politically. This is not surprising, as

in Human rights and the borders of suffering
Kelly-Kate Pease

Human rights and humanitarian diplomacy is the bargaining, negotiating, and advocating process involved with promoting and protecting international human rights and humanitarian principles. This diplomacy is also a secondary mechanism for discovering or defining new rights and principles. For centuries, diplomacy in general was the exclusive preserve of states. States use diplomacy as a foreign policy tool to achieve complicated and often competing goals. Today, human rights and humanitarian diplomacy is conducted on many levels by individuals who

in Human rights and humanitarian diplomacy