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Abstract only
Sandra Buchanan

examination of Lederach’s interdependence, justice and process–structure gaps, alongside the core concepts of citizen empowerment, development aid and social and economic development, provided a working definition of conflict transformation along with five criteria outlining the essential requirements for successful conflict transformation. Together they provided the conceptual and

in Transforming conflict through social and economic development
Sandra Buchanan

culture, along with his interdependence gap, justice gap and process–structure gap theories, support a constructive framework. For Lederach, conflict resolution does not ‘adequately describe the ongoing nature of conflict in the relational ebb and flow over time, or its usefulness in the construction of peace’. 25 Conflict transformation, however, is much

in Transforming conflict through social and economic development
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European integration as a system of conflict resolution in the Franco-German relationship (1950–63)
Boyka Stefanova

This chapter presents a case study concerning the application of regional integration as a system of conflict resolution in the example of the Franco-German relationship of the 1950s. It traces early attempts to break the cycle of punitive peace between France and Germany, and analyses the meaning of Europeanisation during the 1950s as a strategy of peace-building accomplished through joint policy-making in the European Coal and Steel Community (ECSC) and the institutionalisation of a customs union through the European Economic Community (EEC). This chapter also highlights the significance of Europeanisation for domestic political pluralism and for the politicisation of economic interdependence.

in The Europeanisation of conflict resolution
Abstract only
Boyka Stefanova

responses they generate on behalf of political actors. The second argument refers to the link between European integration and issues relevant to conflict resolution in international relations theory, such as sovereignty, interdependence, peace processes, state building, and the constitutionalisation of conflict resolution. What do the findings in the individual chapters suggest about the effects of European

in The Europeanisation of conflict resolution
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Boyka Stefanova

relations theory and examine the EU’s conflict resolution capacity in terms of power (Barnett and Duval 2005 ), actorness (Ginsberg 1999 ), regional interdependence (Tavares 2004 ), security community building (Deutsch et al . 1957 ; Wæver 1998 ), reconciliation as a result of a common European identity (Parsons 2004 ), or desecuritisation (Diez et al . 2008a ). The

in The Europeanisation of conflict resolution
Theory and framework
Boyka Stefanova

influential third powers, international organisations, structural interdependence, and liberal internationalism. The objective is to identify the elements and causal paths of integration with a capacity to resolve conflict and to contribute new insights into the intriguing relationship between European integration and peace. Building upon the proposition about the transformative nature of European governance

in The Europeanisation of conflict resolution
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The failure of neutrality?
Christine Agius

have bought into the idea that the state has become obsolete. Clearly it has not, 1 and the claims that neutrality holds back further integration and interdependence is a misguided view that neglects an important variable in the processes of globalisation. Sovereignty may be taking on a new form, but it is still the state that creates the conditions for a globalised world. If this were not the case

in The social construction of Swedish neutrality
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Christine Agius

’ (Browning, 1999 ; Bukovansky, 1997 ; Goetschel, 1999 ; Goldmann, 1994 ; Malmborg, 2001 ), but this makes up a minority of the literature. Rather than mine this vein, the attachment to identity is pitched against the more important demands of interdependence and new ‘realities’ in the international system. There has been a distinctive debate which has clouded any potential work that may conceptualise neutrality as something other

in The social construction of Swedish neutrality
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Imogen Richards

factors beyond political economy, the West, and the US inevitably come into play in the rise to prevalence of groups such as AQ and IS, this book begins from the premise that dialectical engagements between neo-jihadism and neoliberalism are significant and worthy of further critical reflection insofar as they denote the political-economic reciprocity and interdependence of opposing, politically violent actors. I argue in the following chapters that while dispossession, marginalisation, and violence perpetrated by Western actors against majority-Muslim populations have

in Neoliberalism and neo-jihadism
Bildt, Europe and neutrality in the post-Cold War era
Christine Agius

characterised the immediate aftermath of bipolarity’s demise. During the Cold War years, the enemy was clearly defined. Subsequently, security was broadened to include economic, immigration, and environmental threats. Terrorism, civil conflict, human rights and individual security rose to the top of the security agenda. Interdependence and cooperation became the key to tackling the diffuse and varied security

in The social construction of Swedish neutrality