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Math Noortmann
and
Luke D. Graham

. The legal and institutional structure of the EU is the most complicated and advanced of all regional intergovernmental organisations. Because of its far-reaching powers, the EU is also referred to as a supranational organisation. Its main objectives are (Article B Maastricht Treaty): to establish an economic and monetary union; to develop cooperation in the field of

in The basics of international law
Author:

International organisations are a central component of modern international society. This book provides a concise account of the principles and norms of international law applicable to the intergovernmental organisation (IGO). It defines and explains inter-governmentalism and the role of law in its regulation. The book presents case studies that show how the law works within an institutional order dominated by politics. After a note on the key relationship between the IGO and its member states, it examines the basic relationship between the UN and states in terms of membership through admissions, withdrawal, expulsion, suspension, and representation. The debate about the extent of the doctrine of legal powers is addressed through case studies. Institutional lawmaking in the modern era is discussed with particular focus on at the impact of General Assembly Resolutions on outer space and the Health Regulations of the World Health Organization. Non-forcible measures adopted by the UN and similar IGOs in terms of their legality (constitutionality and conformity to international law), legitimacy and effectiveness, is covered next. The different military responses undertaken by IGOs, ranging from observation and peacekeeping, to peace enforcement and war-fighting, are discussed in terms of legality and practice. The book also considers the idea of a Responsibility to Protect and the development of secondary rules of international law to cover the wrongful acts and omissions of IGOs. It ends with a note on how the primary and secondary rules of international law are upheld in different forms and mechanisms of accountability, including courts.

Math Noortmann
and
Luke D. Graham

Intergovernmental organisations Two types of legal personality can be distinguished in intergovernmental organisations: Legal personality under national law (e.g., Article 104 of the UN Charter). It is used to perform legal acts under private law on the territory of Member States. Examples are renting buildings, hiring staff, or buying office supplies

in The basics of international law
Abstract only
A ‘new humanitarianism’?
Silvia Salvatici

from finances received for the implementation of specific projects from the UN agencies, the regional intergovernmental organisations such as the European Civil Protection and Humanitarian Aid Operations (ECHO) and national governments. 23 In the by now complex global network through which international relief moves, the NGOs as a whole have reached the point where they ‘form the backbone of the delivery mechanism’ 24 and are in the front line of work in the field. Finally, according to much of the literature, the chief promoters of humanitarian action are

in A history of humanitarianism, 1755–1989
Silvia Salvatici

in action. 1 This is how President Franklin Delano Roosevelt addressed the director general of the United Nations Relief and Rehabilitation Administration (UNRRA), Herbert H. Lehman, in November 1944. A leading figure in the Democrat Party and governor of the State of New York from 1933 to 1942, Lehman had been a strong supporter of the New Deal. However, he had not been given the office of director general of the intergovernmental organisation that had to take the necessary aid to the populations hit by the war ‘to start a new life’ just because

in A history of humanitarianism, 1755–1989
Raj Chari
,
John Hogan
,
Gary Murphy
, and
Michele Crepaz

future decisions. Second, some claim that there is an inherent ‘moral’ difference between types of lobbyists or, more simply put, there are some lobbyists that can be considered ‘better’ than others. For example, based on the classifications offered above, a view often heard when we advised the Venice Commission of the Council of Europe – an intergovernmental organisation dedicated to the furthering of human rights – was that corporate lobbying can be considered ‘bad’ when compared to, for example, that done by NGOs which is deemed to be naturally ‘good

in Regulating lobbying (second edition)
Silvia Salvatici

and food – that went back to the long tradition of ‘colonial humanitarianism’. 51 The recent experience of the World War was added to that of the long period of colonialism. The relief and rehabilitation programmes that had opened the road to the post-war reconstruction, in Europe especially, were also an important inheritance for the new path of international relief. From the end of the 1940s on, the improvement in the ‘underdeveloped’ countries’ socio-economic conditions took a major place on the agenda of the intergovernmental organisations, most of all

in A history of humanitarianism, 1755–1989
The UK Context

The Basics of International Law presents a comprehensive and accessible entry-level text which provides the most essential and basic rules and facts of international law in pocket format. This quick reference text offers UK-specific examples to contextualise international law concepts and directs the reader to further sources. Topics covered include: the place of international law in the national legal order; subjects of international law; sources of public international law; treaty law; jurisdiction; immunities; state responsibility; settlement of disputes; the enforcement of international law; peace and security; the law of international organisations; the United Nations; other global international organisations; regional intergovernmental organisations; international human rights; international criminal law; international economic law; and, international environmental law.

Math Noortmann
and
Luke D. Graham

intergovernmental organisations on the basis of their competences. In supranational organisations, binding decisions can be taken by majority vote. This is not possible in purely intergovernmental organisations. Most organisations are intergovernmental. Table 4 Classification

in The basics of international law
Abstract only
Math Noortmann
and
Luke D. Graham

development (UNCED)) (see section 119 ); the increase in humanitarian actions; and the cooperation between intergovernmental organisations (IGOs) and non-governmental organisations (NGOs). 4 Natural law and positivism The development of international law

in The basics of international law