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A feminist analysis, with a new introduction

Representing the first book-length treatment of the application of feminist theories of international law, The boundaries of international law argues that the absence of women in the development of international law has produced a narrow and inadequate jurisprudence that has legitimated the unequal position of women worldwide rather than confronted it.

With a new introduction that reflects on the profound changes in international law since the book’s first publication in 2000, this volume is essential reading for scholars, practitioners and students alike.

Hilary Charlesworth and Christine Chinkin

Introduction This chapter and the next examine various modes of international law- making to investigate the interests and perspectives they support. Here, we describe the law with respect to customary international law, general principles of law and subsidiary sources of law. Chapter 4 looks more specifically at the law of treaties. We deal with the traditional

in The boundaries of international law
Hilary Charlesworth and Christine Chinkin

Introduction This book uses feminist theories to sustain its claim that the absence of women in international law has distorted the discipline’s boundaries. The aim of this chapter is to introduce these theories and to consider their value in understanding international law. As a background to this task, we first discuss the theories that underpin traditional international

in The boundaries of international law
Alexis Heraclides and Ada Dialla

Advocates and opponents of humanitarian intervention From the 1860s onwards, international law became an academic discipline in its own right in Europe and the Americas, taught separately from philosophy, natural law or civil law, and came to be written by professional academics or theoretically inclined diplomats. 1 Until then what existed was the droit public de l’Europe or ‘external public law’. Britain in particular had to

in Humanitarian intervention in the long nineteenth century
Hilary Charlesworth and Christine Chinkin

Introduction This book has argued that sex and gender shape international law. It has questioned the universality and objectivity of international law because of the exclusion of women from its substance, methodologies and processes. It has examined the assumptions of the international legal order that inculcate particular conceptions of gender and reinforce in turn ideas

in The boundaries of international law
Hilary Charlesworth and Christine Chinkin

Introduction The control and regulation of state violence is one of the cornerstones of post-UN Charter international law. The primary purpose of the UN is ‘[t]o maintain international peace and security … to take effective collective measures for the prevention and removal of threats to the peace, and for the suppression of acts of aggression or other breaches of the

in The boundaries of international law
Setting the precedent

This book is an attempt at a comprehensive presentation of the history of humanitarian intervention in the long nineteenth century, the heyday of this controversial doctrine. It starts with a brief presentation of the present situation and debate. The theoretical first part of the book starts with the genealogy of the idea, namely the quest for the progenitors of the idea in the sixteenth and seventeenth century which is a matter of controversy. Next the nineteenth century ‘civilization-barbarity’ dichotomy is covered and its bearing on humanitarian intervention, with its concomitant Eurocentric/Orientalist gaze towards the Ottomans and other states, concluding with the reaction of the Ottomans (as well as the Chinese and Japanese). Then the pivotal international law dimension is scrutinized, with the arguments of advocates and opponents of humanitarian intervention from the 1830s until the 1930s. The theoretical part of the book concludes with nineteenth century international political theory and intervention (Kant, Hegel, Cobden, Mazzini and especially J.S. Mill). In the practical second part of the book four cases studies of humanitarian intervention are examined in considerable detail: the Greek case (1821-1831), the Lebanon/Syria case (1860-61), the Balkan crisis and Bulgarian case (1875-78) in two chapters, and the U.S. intervention in Cuba (1895-98). Each cases study concludes with its bearing on the evolution of international norms and rules of conduct in instances of humanitarian plights. The concluding chapter identifies the main characteristics of intervention on humanitarian grounds during this period and today’s criticism and counter-criticism.

Third edition
Author: Leslie C. Green

It has been accepted since antiquity that some restraint should be observed during armed conflict. This book examines the apparent dichotomy and introduces any study of the law of armed conflict by considering the nature and legality of war. The purpose of what is known as the law of armed conflict or, more commonly, the law of war is to reduce the horrors inherent therein to the greatest extent possible, bearing in mind the political purpose for which the war is fought, namely to achieve one's policies over one's enemies. The discussion on the history and sources of the law of armed conflict pays most attention to warfare on land because that is the region for which most agreements have been drawn up, although attention has been accorded to both aerial and naval warfare where it has been considered necessary. Traditionally, international law was divided into the law of war and the law of peace, with no intermediate stage between. Although diplomatic relations between belligerents are normally severed once a conflict has commenced, there remain a number of issues, not all of which are concerned with their inter-belligerent relations, which require them to remain in contact. War crimes are violations of the and customs of the law of armed conflict and are punishable whether committed by combatants or civilians, including the nationals of neutral states. The book also talks about the rights and duties of the Occupying Power, civil defence, branches of international law and prisoners of war.

Hilary Charlesworth and Christine Chinkin

Introduction This book is about why issues of sex and gender matter in international law. Its central argument is that the absence of women in the development of international law has produced a narrow and inadequate jurisprudence that has, among other things, legitimated the unequal position of women around the world rather than challenged it. In this sense, the absence of

in The boundaries of international law
Abstract only
Hilary Charlesworth and Christine Chinkin

Introduction Treaties have become increasingly important throughout the twentieth century as a means of securing states’ commitment to legal obligations. 1 The major advantages of treaties as a source of international law are perceived to be the certainty of a written text and the comparative ease of determining the parties. The wide acceptance of the Vienna Convention on

in The boundaries of international law