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Ruth Barton

, concentrate on intimacy – too much, not enough – and connectivity, negotiating the city’s networks and their connections to the wider world. ‘The spatial’, Doreen Massey has argued ( 1994 : 4): can be seen as constructed out of the multiplicity of social relations across all spatial scales, from the global reach of finance and telecommunications, through the geography of the tentacles of national political power, to the social relations within the town, the settlement, the household and the workplace. These spatial dynamics play out

in Irish cinema in the twenty-first century
Ruth Barton

object of contemplation rather than offering the intimacy of identification. As numerous critics have argued, the film’s weakness is its refusal to engage in any detail with the politics of Northern Ireland, specifically the relationship between the hunger strikers and the IRA command outside the prison, and its erasure of the fact that while on hunger strike Sands was elected as a Member of Parliament. Emilie Pine, for instance, criticises Hunger for elevating Sands’s martyrdom over all else, so that the viewer is left with only one possible conclusion, that he is

in Irish cinema in the twenty-first century
Ruth Barton

layering of present on past in contemporary rural Ireland, it is also distinctive for its queering of the rural space. Fintan Walsh ( 2013 : 217) has usefully argued of Adam & Paul and Garage that ‘although the queer is only subtly implied in these works – in the odd couplings, frustrated desires and complex intimacies – in a timely fashion the films go some way to register the excluded place and space of queerness in Irish film and culture’. Thus, the heteronormative family is consistently shown up as a sham, with the central characters of each film in (usually

in Irish cinema in the twenty-first century