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Abstract only
Jack Holland

of intimacy. That process, in this period, has been remarkable, and it inspired this book’s writing. To begin with, therefore, before turning to evaluate the enduring challenge of studying the Trump presidency, this conclusion recaps and summarises some of the ground covered and arguments developed. The phenomenon that these arguments help to conceptualise will long outlast Trump’s tenure. After that, in its second section, the conclusion does necessarily highlight the importance of popular culture and fictional television right now in the contemporary era that is

in Fictional television and American Politics
Andy Lawrence

title of the film refers to many expressions that unfold from and then fold back into one single source. By physically immersing myself in this way of thinking I started to understand the nature and intimacy of relationships that are governed by a set of beliefs other than my own and articulated in a spoken language that I could barely comprehend. In the following sections, I identify a ‘core’ of traditions in ethnographic and documentary filmmaking that privilege one particular style or approach: c ollaboration, o bservation, r eflexivity and e xpression. This

in Filmmaking for fieldwork
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Mise-en-scène
Andrew Dix

. This incorporates a stabilising mount for the camera that is attached to the operator, thus reproducing the handheld camera’s intimacy and extensive territorial range but without repeating its unsteady, even queasy locomotion. Discussion in Chapter 2 of Aleksandr Sokurov’s film Russian Ark (2002) will consider how the Steadicam has modified not only mise-en-scène but also editing. Focus All of those camera movements so far described potentially affect one further property of the film image: its quality of focus. Here the filmmaker’s selection from

in Beginning film studies (second edition)
Abstract only
Andrew Dix

conspicuous elsewhere. There is the suggestion here of an immediacy and intimacy of communication between star and spectator that differs markedly from the form of distanced worship that prevailed with respect to the stars of classical Hollywood. Unfortunately, however, social networking sites are liable to repurposing by stars so that they function less as spaces of informal, democratic interaction than as additional platforms for commercial promotion. To glance at Tom Cruise’s Twitter feed during the summer of 2014, for instance, is not to encounter a stream of frank

in Beginning film studies (second edition)
Andy Lawrence

and smartphones, and some DSLR and mirrorless cameras aimed at video make use of a zoom lens. When using zoom lenses do not rely on adopting a static position away from the main action. Instead ‘zoom with your legs’ and move yourself nearer to a subject, and use the optical zoom only to refine your framing. There are a number of reasons for this. Shooting with a wide angle allows you to bring the microphone closer to the action to record a more focused and compelling sound. This creates intimacy with a subject and introduces accountability through proximity, which is

in Filmmaking for fieldwork
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Brian McFarlane
and
Anthony Slide

( b Stroud, 1960 – d Cheltenham, 2003). Actor. Marlborough-educated Addie had experience with the National Youth Theatre and is best remembered by filmgoers for playing – and looking the part of – the adult Mordred in John B OORMAN ’s Excalibur (1981). TV included Merlin (1998) as Sir Gilbert. OTHER BRITISH FILMS INCLUDE : Absolution (1978), Another Country (1984), Intimacy (2001, UK/Fr). Addison, John ( b Cobham, Surrey, 1920 – d Bennington, Vermont, 1998). Composer. In his enormously productive career, Addison composed for the theatre and

in The Encyclopedia of British Film