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‘Poor’ Europe’s pathways to empire and globalisation
Andrew Mackillop

an investment and development strategy, lies at the heart of this book. As a mode of expansion it constituted the primary means by which the metropolitan provinces of the pre-1815 British and Irish Isles accessed the eastern hemisphere of England and later Britain’s world empire. The emergence of this economy of human capital and its capacity to accumulate financial surpluses offers a number of interpretative perspectives. Firstly, it provides a holistic understanding of the scale of Ireland, Scotland and Wales’s participation in a part of the British Empire that

in Human capital and empire
Open Access (free)
Sabine Clarke

reinvented as an industrial raw material. Notes 1 M. Harrison, Jamaica, the Caribbean and the World Sugar Industry (New York: New York University Press, 2001); R. Kiely, The Politics of Labour and Development in Trinidad (Kingston: The University of the West Indies Press, 1996), pp. 5–6; B. datt Tewarie and R. Hosein, Trade Investment and Development in the Contemporary Caribbean (Kingston: Ian Randle, 2007); A. Payne and P. Sutton, Charting Caribbean Development (London: Macmillan Caribbean, 2001

in Science at the end of empire
Health, climate and settlement in colonial Western Australia
Ruth A. Morgan

have pushed projects for investment and development on the basis of inadequate research and over-hopeful assessment’, producing a rhythm of boom and bust since its colonisation in 1829. 5 Although Western Australia was long the ‘Cinderella’ of the Australasian colonies as a result, the contributors to this collection demonstrate that it was not alone in what might be seen as a broader

in Imperial expectations and realities
Harold Moody and the League of Coloured Peoples
David Killingray

trusteeship; indirect rule needed to be extended; African education expanded with the use of vernacular languages; economic investment and development were vital; and there needed to be a colour-blind empire with Africans promoted to positions of authority and trust. For the West Indies, the LCP urged federation, self-government, a university, and insisted that generations of economic neglect be drastically reversed by

in West Indian intellectuals in Britain
John M. MacKenzie

investment in imperial development had its origins in 1929, but it was only from 1945 that it became truly significant in both British and French efforts to regenerate their empires. As with the Tanganyika groundnut scheme, the policy was promoted with considerable optimism. Empire could at last be justified on the grounds of enlightened official notions of welfare, investment and development. The

in British culture and the end of empire
Abstract only
Mary Chamberlain

feel that in the West Indian context this is merely an excuse for Britain to be rid of them. 24 Quite who the ‘responsible elements’ were is open to question. Investment and development aid was, however, a key issue for the Federation given the historic levels of under-development and the economic vulnerability of the West Indies. Although Barbados was

in Empire and nation-building in the Caribbean
The morphogenesis of an African regional capital
Liora Bigon

attest to the fact that the French did not lose their architectural genius, but restrained its geographical expressions. 44 In addition, the Great Depression and the Second World War slowed down urban investment and development in the French colonies of sub-Saharan Africa. However, the idea of unity with France, which had been manifested in the French Union, was realised in 1946, and consequently

in French colonial Dakar