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Alex Robertson and Colin Lees
Bulletin of the John Rylands Library
Bulletin of the John Rylands Library
Bulletin of the John Rylands Library
Bulletin of the John Rylands Library
Noble Communities and the Completion of the Psalter-Hours John Rylands Library Latin MS 117
Richard Leson

Judging from repetitious appearances of her marital arms in the painted line-endings, the Psalter-Hours John Rylands Library Latin MS 117 probably belonged to Jeanne of Flanders (c.1272–1333), daughter of Count Robert III of Flanders and in 1288 second wife to Enguerrand IV of Coucy. Yet the line-endings also contain some 1,800 diminutive painted escutcheons, many of which refer to other members of the local nobility active during the 1280s. This study, based on an exhaustive survey of the total heraldic and codicological evidence, suggests that the majority of the extant Psalter predated the Hours and that the two parts were combined after the 1288 marriage. The ‘completed’ manuscript bears witness to major events that unfolded in and around the Coucy barony over the course of the decade. It suggests a complex relationship between Jeanne of Flanders and a lesser member of the local nobility, a certain Marien of Moÿ, who may have served as her attendant.

Bulletin of the John Rylands Library
Open Access (free)
Biography of a Radical Newspaper
Robert Poole

The newly digitised Manchester Observer (1818–22) was England’s leading radical newspaper at the time of the Peterloo meeting of August 1819, in which it played a central role. For a time it enjoyed the highest circulation of any provincial newspaper, holding a position comparable to that of the Chartist Northern Star twenty years later and pioneering dual publication in Manchester and London. Its columns provide insights into Manchester’s notoriously secretive local government and policing and into the labour and radical movements of its turbulent times. Rich materials in the Home Office papers in the National Archives reveal much about the relationship between radicals in London and in the provinces, and show how local magistrates conspired with government to hound the radical press in the north as prosecutions in London ran into trouble. This article also sheds new light on the founding of the Manchester Guardian, which endured as the Observer’s successor more by avoiding its disasters than by following its example. Despite the imprisonment of four of its main editors and proprietors the Manchester Observer battled on for five years before sinking in calmer water for lack of news.

Bulletin of the John Rylands Library
Abstract only
Feeling modern and visually aware in the nineteenth century

Madrid on the move is a full-length monograph on illustrated print culture and the urban experience in nineteenth-century Spain. It provides a fresh account of modernity by looking beyond its canonical texts, artworks, and locations and exploring what being modern meant to people in their daily lives. The nineteenth century marked a crucial moment for cities across the West. Urbanisation, technological innovations, and the development of a mass culture yielded new forms of spectatorship and experiencing city life. Madrid underwent these processes just as many other European capitals did, and, as a result, the effects of urban and social change were at the heart of the growing number of circulating images and texts. Rather than shifting the loci of modernity from Paris or London to Madrid, this book decentres the concept and explains the modern experience as part of a more fluid, wider phenomenon. Meanings of the modern were not only dictated by linguistic authorities and urban technocrats; they were discussed, lived, and constructed on a daily basis. Cultural actors and audiences continuously redefined what being modern entailed and explored the links between the local and the global, two concepts and contexts that were being conceived and perceived as inseparable. Across images and printed media – from illustrated magazines, caricatures, and postcards to journalistic writing, guidebooks, and maps – what surfaced was an acute awareness of the demands of modernisation and a feeling of forming part of (whether half-heartedly or with conviction) an increasingly entangled world.

Art schools and art education
James Moore

5 A ‘solid foundation’? Art schools and art education Schools of art and design became part of the urban infrastructure of the Lancashire region many years before the creation of major municipal art galleries. By the mid-1840s, both Liverpool and Manchester had established schools of art or design, and thirty years later almost every major town in the north-west had an art school of some sort.1 This remarkable growth in public art education was partly the product of local initiatives and partly the work of government policy at a time when the promotion of art

in High culture and tall chimneys
The formation and development of the Walker Art Gallery
James Moore

owed much to the activities of private philanthropists and sponsors. Perhaps the most notable and controversial instance of private philanthropy in gallery formation is the case of Liverpool, where a local brewer, Andrew Barclay Walker, not only provided the full funds for the gallery’s construction, but also supported its later extension and development. Other galleries in Lancashire also received significant amounts of private support, but this was usually in the form of bequests. Harris’s funding of the Preston gallery took this form, as did the funding for the

in High culture and tall chimneys