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Clare Wilkinson and Emma Weitkamp

the potential to reach large and diverse audiences, but in practice getting noticed is not so easy. Few of us will be as lucky as @LegoAcademics to attract 14,000 Twitter followers in less than a week (Cramb, 2014 ); despite the marketing hype, going viral is not easy to achieve, and most researchers will have to work hard to secure an online audience. However, if you have a clearly defined group you wish to reach (such as a local community or specific interest group), then the narrowcasting that is possible online can help you reach those people most likely to be

in Creative research communication
Clare Wilkinson and Emma Weitkamp

taking place for over a hundred years in the United States with the annual Christmas bird count. Archaeology, astronomy and natural history have strong traditions of involving volunteers in research and/or existing communities with significant interests and research skills – communities which have sometimes been termed ‘amateur’ scientists. However, the value of citizen contributions to formal research is increasingly recognised, and a large number of projects are springing up around the world that include contributions from interested amateurs and local communities

in Creative research communication
Helen Brooks and Penny Bee

interested in and require a different type or level of knowledge. For examples, study participants often want to know the results of the study to which they contributed their data. The general public may be less interested in the results per se and more concerned with what they mean for their own future health care decisions or care needs. Policy makers and service commissioners may be interested in what the results tell them about improving population health outcomes, as well as the cost of providing new or improved services to local and national communities. We know from

in A research handbook for patient and public involvement researchers
Abstract only
Clare Wilkinson and Emma Weitkamp

minority views held by those with greater levels of expertise, particularly in political eras of sound bite and celebrity (Held, 2006 ). In other words, providing people with information, and the time to consider it, seeks to allow more considered decision making, which can include decision making on scientific, social and research-based issues. Deliberation also provides opportunities to explore issues that are more personalised and local in nature, contributing to political decision making that can be defended on its basis within the contexts to which it is relevant

in Creative research communication
Andrew C. Grundy

team, this kind of involvement can be achieved through holding focus groups, discussions or local and national stakeholder events. 13 BEE (RESEARCH) PRINT.indd 13 11/05/2018 16:14 Designing the study Having developed a research question, it is important to decide which methods might be the best to answer it. Research generally falls into two types: quantitative research and qualitative research. Quantitative generates numerical data, often through the use of large studies, using methods such as questionnaires and surveys. We will learn more about how to collect

in A research handbook for patient and public involvement researchers
Abstract only
Clare Wilkinson and Emma Weitkamp

can allow you to be more creative or experimental. Investigate national or local organisations that might be looking for researchers to speak to them; for example, community groups like the University of the Third Age, the Women’s Institute or groups aimed at young people, like Guides and Scouts, offer good settings to try out face-to-face communication for the first time. Schools Within formal education there are also many opportunities to deliver your research ideas or experiences; presentations, workshops, clubs or school visits can all provide a

in Creative research communication
Open Access (free)
Linda Davies and Gemma Shields

began, doctors could only prescribe first generation drugs. However local psychiatrists and service users wanted the newer second generation drugs to be made available, as there was some evidence that they were safe to use and were effective in reducing the symptoms of schizophrenia, with less troublesome side-effects. 75 BEE (RESEARCH) PRINT.indd 75 11/05/2018 16:15 However there was a big cost difference; the newer SGA drugs cost the NHS around £1500-£2000 per person per year of treatment, compared to around £100 a year for the FGA. The research trial aimed to

in A research handbook for patient and public involvement researchers
Abstract only
Clare Wilkinson and Emma Weitkamp

reflects the modern use of the term. An audience would originally have comprised small groups of local spectators capable of responding to and interacting with a public display, presentation or performance; it was only the advent of the modern mass media which saw a depiction of a far larger audience, dispersed consumers, often in their private home environment, which cultivated the depiction of audiences as having a relatively passive role (McQuail, 1997 ). Though the communication environment has been changing, with increased opportunities for audiences to be

in Creative research communication
Abstract only
Clare Wilkinson and Emma Weitkamp

artists at work; and the National Museums of Liverpool, which has proactively sought through Positive Images, a programme designed to explore local heritage, to engage those groups who would not normally consider taking part in a museum experience. When it comes to developing new works of art to be sited in public spaces, artists may now meet with members of the local community as well as the art establishment with a view to creating artworks that both are inviting spaces for the local community and also provide aesthetic interest. Such approaches might also serve to

in Creative research communication
Open Access (free)
Designing and road testing new measurement scales
Patrick Callaghan

Measure (or PROM) – a questionnaire, completed by a service user, to measure quality involvement in care planning. We met as a group to draft the questions and discuss how they should be worded. As PPI representatives and researchers, we used our existing networks, including social media and our contacts with local service user and carer groups, to get as many people as possible to complete our new questionnaire. This gave us lots of data and meant that we could validate the measure properly. We have been able to develop a short 14-item questionnaire that is valid and

in A research handbook for patient and public involvement researchers