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Constructing population in the search for disease genes
Steve Sturdy

geneticists thought about human genetic diversity and, ultimately, about human populations. Capturing human genetic variation Initially the work of identifying and cataloguing SNPs proceeded in a relatively uncoordinated fashion, with the establishment of local databases in a number of leading North American and European research centres. However, this work progressed against a backdrop of concern that researchers’ access to large bodies of accumulated genomic data was threatened by moves to bring those data into private ownership. In

in Global health and the new world order
Dominique Bon

2 Cholera epidemics, local politics and nationalism in the province of Nice during the first half of the nineteenth century Dominique Bon Introduction Over most of the nineteenth century, the health policy of the Kingdom of Sardinia underwent substantial change due to several factors. The threat of new ‘exotic’ epidemics – yellow fever and especially Asiatic cholera – cast doubts on a quarantine protection system designed, as Daniel Panzac showed for European Mediterranean countries at large, for the prevention of bubonic plague.1 Besides, following the liberal

in Mediterranean Quarantines, 1750–1914
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Medical culture and identity in provincial England, c.1760–1850
Author: Michael Brown

This book talks about late eighteenth- and early nineteenth-century English medical culture, a study of what it meant to be a doctor and how this changed over time. It presents a brief overview of the social, economic and cultural landscape of late eighteenth-century York. Medical culture and identity in late eighteenth-century York took shape within a social landscape shaped by the values of gentility, polite sociability and civic belonging. The book examines the role of intellectual liberality, demonstrating how public displays of polite and 'ornamental' learning were central to the performance of medico-gentility. It explores the incipient demise of this culture. Through a close reading of a scandal which enveloped the York Lunatic Asylum, it also explores the ways in which medical identities founded upon gentility and politeness were critically undermined by the political and social factionalism. The book looks at medical involvement in the provincial scientific movement, examining how local medical men positioned themselves relative to the so-called 'march of intellect', the cultural and ideological alignment between science and social reform. It continues this analysis in relation to the cholera epidemic of 1832 and other medico-political activities. The book considers how the professional dominion over healthcare was forged by the dual processes of inclusion and exclusion. It discusses the foundation of the Medical School in 1834 against the trial, in the same year, of a local salesman for James Morison's 'Universal Vegetable Medicine'.

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Dolto in the twenty-first century
Richard Bates

, unlike most of the other speakers, made no reference to local circumstances, instead presenting the case of a French child whose suffering and cure were explained in terms of the unconscious transmission of maternal anxiety. 7 Her conclusion that ‘the psychical balance of a child is tightly linked to its ancestral past, even to [events] more than two generations distant’ was not intended to refer to socio-political issues, and might easily have come from René Laforgue’s casebook of ‘family neurosis’ patients from fifty

in Psychoanalysis and the family in twentieth-century France
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Psychoanalysis in the public sphere, 1968–88
Richard Bates

its pathogenic transmission to the children. Once Dolto’s group had paved the way and persuaded the French state of the merits of funding the scheme, LAEPs on the MV model began to appear nationwide in the 1980s, supported by local and national public funds from the Allocations Familiales, the Fonds d’Action Sociale and the Fondation de France. Dolto’s hope that private sector sponsorship might ultimately suffice, thus avoiding the ‘educational dogmatism and the administrative and bureaucratic sickness that oversees

in Psychoanalysis and the family in twentieth-century France
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Doltomania
Richard Bates

worldwide without the kind of adaptation to local circumstances that more perceptive psychiatric practitioners, such as Frantz Fanon, understood to be necessary. 38 At its extreme, this amounted to a virtual dismissal of the psychological impact even of the Holocaust, as Chapters 3 and 4 show. Only on one brief occasion, highlighted in the Afterword, did Dolto seem to perceive the importance of race as a psychological category, and she found the experience disconcerting. This book thus approaches Dolto as a thoroughly

in Psychoanalysis and the family in twentieth-century France
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Psychoanalysis in interwar France
Richard Bates

disproportionate number of women doctors were obliged to seek posts in the expanding public health sector between the wars: in local clinics, or working for the Assistance Publique. They needed strength of purpose to persevere in the profession, whereas male medical students, following a family tradition, might be no more vocation-driven than Charles Bovary.’ France between the Wars , p. 96. 32 Dolto, Autoportrait , p. 142. 33 Ohayon, L’Impossible Rencontre , p. 184

in Psychoanalysis and the family in twentieth-century France
Dolto, psychoanalysis and Catholicism from Occupation to Liberation
Richard Bates

… Disease is not an accident. 65 As a generalist herself at this time, ‘F.M.’ had a personal interest in persuading people to choose the pastoral care of a medical generalist. Doing so put her in tune with the intellectual orientation of Carrel and Coutrot, while also aligning with the nostalgic and traditionalist components of Vichy thinking. Her idealised local doctor appeared to inhabit a rural France of small-scale, ethnically homogeneous communities unsullied by industrial civilisation. She

in Psychoanalysis and the family in twentieth-century France
Dolto and the psychoanalytic approach to autism in France
Richard Bates

Barker, supplied psychoactive substances to some of their patients. The relationship of psychoanalysis to the burgeoning radical psychiatry movement differed according to the local intellectual context, as can most obviously be seen by comparing the situation in the United States to that in France. In the United States, psychoanalysis had achieved widespread cultural ascendancy and a degree of hegemony within psychiatry by the 1950s, such that the American Psychiatric Association and most major university psychiatry

in Psychoanalysis and the family in twentieth-century France
Ida Milne

 85 4 ‘Managing’ the crisis How medical care was organised and managed in early twentieth-​ century Ireland? How did patients access the system? What role did the Government play in the pandemic, through its local agents bearing responsibility for overseeing public health and sanitation, the Local Government Board for Ireland? This chapter argues that the influenza epidemic, by placing pressure on the medical system and its institutions, highlighted pre-​existing tensions between the LGB and the BOGs as local administrators of the Poor Law dispensary system

in Stacking the coffins